It would certainly have made life easier for Lassie. Scientists are designing computers that can be used by dogs so they can play, operate household appliances and even communicate with their owners. Scientists are designing computers that can be ...
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  1. Dogs to get their iPaws as scientists build computers for animals
  2. Blind sled dog Gonzo gets help from his brother Poncho
  3. K-9 Comfort Dogs Help Grieving Newtown Families
  4. Our dogs often are reflections of who we are Read
  5. Service Dogs Pick Up Scent of Diabetes Danger
  6. More Recent Articles

Dogs to get their iPaws as scientists build computers for animals

It would certainly have made life easier for Lassie. Scientists are designing computers that can be used by dogs so they can play, operate household appliances and even communicate with their owners.

 Scientists are designing computers that can be used by dogs so they can play, operate household appliances and even communicate with their owners.

The researchers hope the technology can help make daily tasks quicker and easier for the animals in the same way it has transformed the lives of humans.

The project is aimed at developing devices that can be controlled using touch screens and objects that can shaken like an iPhone by dogs to control computers. MORE>>


 
    

Blind sled dog Gonzo gets help from his brother Poncho


JEFFERSON, N.H. - When Gonzo started tripping over his food dish three years ago, no one could explain or stop the Alaskan husky's quickly advancing blindness. But a veterinarian offered some simple advice: "Run this dog."
Gonzo, one of 120 dogs at Muddy Paw Sled Dog Kennel, was happy to comply. With help from his brother, Poncho, he soon resumed his place pulling a sled all over New Hampshire's North Country to the delight of tourists and his caretakers, who quickly realized that if Gonzo didn't treat his blindness like an obstacle, neither would they. Given the dog's obvious eagerness, he was allowed to continue on as usual.
"Even though he's blind, he still knows when hook-ups are happening. He's still very aware," said kennel manager Ben Morehouse. "When you have a dog such as Gonzo, with such a want and a drive and a desire ... you try it, you hook up, you see what happens." MORE>>
    

K-9 Comfort Dogs Help Grieving Newtown Families

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Something about petting a dog can say more than a human who may not be able to find the words to consul someone who is grieving.
Dispatched to Newtown, Conn., the dogs have gone from funerals and hospitals, interacting with friends and families of the victims. One child, who hadn’t spoken since the shooting, began talking to one of the dogs.
Another child who witnessed the shootings hadn’t told anyone what he saw, but upon petting one of the dogs, he told the dog the story of what he saw. More.....
    

Our dogs often are reflections of who we are Read

My professional sources inside the dog world tell me it’s no joke that people often resemble their dogs – and vice versa. That includes more than simple appearance, as I noticed the other day.

 A woman came walking down the sidewalk connected by a leash to a border collie. Border collies are frequently listed at No. 1 on lists of the smartest dogs.

They are to the canine world what geniuses like Einstein, Newt Gingrich and Martha Stewart are to the human world. True, Einstein is dead, but so are a lot of border collies.

In fairness, we mustn’t forget that they used to be smart before they became doggie dust. There’s more to similarities between border collies and their humans than brains.

Those dogs have an almost human personality, They are civilized and sane. That woman walking down the sidewalk the other day......read more>>
    

Service Dogs Pick Up Scent of Diabetes Danger

About two times a night, Shana Eppler wakes up to an alarm and slips into her daughter Abbie's room to test the 8-year-old's blood sugar.

 Diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of 4, Abbie experiences low blood-sugar levels, a potentially dangerous condition known as hypoglycemia that can cause the loss of consciousness.

 The alarm Ms. Eppler uses to avoid a health emergency is a furry one named Gracie, an 70-pound, 3-year-old British Labrador retriever trained to sniff out high and low blood-sugar levels.

When Abbie's sugar level rises or falls below a certain target at night, Gracie rings a bell and Ms. Eppler gets up. "The scenting part comes naturally," says Ms. Eppler, of Colorado Springs, Colo.

"They are hunting blood sugars instead of ducks." Diabetic, or hypoglycemic, "alert dogs" are a growing class of service dogs best known for guiding the visually impaired, sniffing out drugs and bombs, or providing mobility assistance for people with severe disabilities.

Most recently, they have been trained to sniff out cancer and oncoming seizures. Toni Eames, president of International Association of Assistance Dog Partners, estimates there are over 30,000 assistance dogs working in the U.S., including dogs that have been trained by individuals.  MORE>>
    

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