In February, this blog will be celebrating its ten-year anniversary! Leading up to it, I’m re-starting a series I tried to do in the past called “A Look Back.” Each week, I’ll be re-posting a few of my favorite posts from the … Continue ...

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  1. A Look Back: “Zootopia Movies Highlights Importance Of Grit, But Also Its Limitations”
  2. “Common Good Forecaster” Is Intriguing Interactive To Measure Impact Of Ed In Every U.S. County
  3. Betsy DeVos Confirmation Hearing Indicates It’s Going To Be A Very Long Four Years For Schools
  4. “Provide ‘Voice’ & ‘Choice’ When Students set Goals”
  5. Free Resources From All My Books
  6. More Recent Articles

A Look Back: “Zootopia Movies Highlights Importance Of Grit, But Also Its Limitations”

In February, this blog will be celebrating its ten-year anniversary! Leading up to it, I’m re-starting a series I tried to do in the past called “A Look Back.” Each week, I’ll be re-posting a few of my favorite posts from the past ten years.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2013’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2014’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2015’s Best Posts From This Blog

This post was originally published in 2016:

I just came back from taking my grandkids to see the new Disney movie “Zootopia.”

Though I agree with other reviewers who say the movie’s message on race and prejudice is a bit muddled, I also have to say that I think it provides an excellent perspective on “grit.”

At the beginning, he movie’s star, Judy the rabbit,  exemplifies the sterotypical belief in grit – she will try, try, try and succeed, and won’t let anything stop her. As the film goes on, however, she finds that her individual grit isn’t enough — she has to deal with additional challenges she faces from the attitudes and prejudices of society at large, and needs advice and assistance from others to ultimately succeed.

This story reflects what I wrote in my Education Week Teacher column titled ‘It’s Time to Change the Conversation About Grit’:

researchers David Yeager, Gregory Walton and Geoffrey L. Cohen have defined [it] as “the fuller formula for success: effort + strategies + help from others.”

The movie’s message is particularly timely in light of very recent cautions from Carol Dweck (Carol Dweck Makes Strongest Statement Yet On Growth Mindset Misuse) and Angela Duckworth (NY Times Reports On Social Emotional Learning Run Amok) about the dangers of viewing Social Emotional Learning as panaceas.

Even with those concerns, I have to admit I also did like the Shakira theme song for the movie, “Try Everything,” and see how that could be used as part of an SEL lesson.

Here are the lyrics to the song, along with four videos:

* The official music video to the movie

* A “lyrics video” of the song

* Two official trailers to the movie

You might also be interested in:

Video: “Better Call Saul” Scene Illustrates The Limitations Of Grit

The Best Video Clips Demonstrating “Grit” – Help Me Find More

 

 

 

 

    

“Common Good Forecaster” Is Intriguing Interactive To Measure Impact Of Ed In Every U.S. County

The Measure of America regularly creates very helpful data interactives and has been on The Best Reference Websites For English Language Learners list for a long time.

They’ve just unveiled what they call the “Common Good Forecaster” “that lets you explore the impact of increased educational attainment on 10 indicators by county, by state, or nationwide.”

They go on to say:

How do education levels affect your community? Education is linked to more than higher incomes and employment rates: better educational attainment is associated with reduced crime rates and less incarceration, higher life expectancies, less obesity, and increased civic engagement. By adjusting adult (25+) education levels, users can see the potential effects on a range of economic, political, and social variables and better understand how investing in education can improve outcomes not only for individuals but for society as a whole.

You can see a screenshot of the page on our county, Sacramento.   They have a big report citing their data and methodology.

I don’t feel I’m qualified to judge its accuracy, but their past reports have seemed pretty impressive.

    

Betsy DeVos Confirmation Hearing Indicates It’s Going To Be A Very Long Four Years For Schools

If you weren’t depressed enough by what you had heard about Betsy DeVos before (see The Best Resources For Learning About Our New U.S. Secretary of Education), you are now (if you watched her confirmation hearing this afternoon) or you will be (after you read about it).

A short, sweet and accurate summary of what happened can be found in Dana Goldstein’s Slate report, The Real Betsy DeVos. Its subtitle is “Donald Trump’s pick for secretary of education tried to sound like a moderate—and revealed that she’s either underprepared or a zealot.”

If you want to read even more depressing details, check out The Washington Post piece, Betsy DeVos, Trump’s education pick, lauded as bold reformer, called unfit for job.

The PBS News Hour also has this report on DeVos today:

 

    

“Provide ‘Voice’ & ‘Choice’ When Students set Goals”

Provide ‘Voice’ & ‘Choice’ When Students set Goals is the headline of my latest Education Week Teacher column.

In it, Regie Routman, Laura Robb, Dr. Lynell Powell, John Spencer and Jeffrey Benson contribute their commentaries on goal-setting with students. It’s part two in a four-post series.

Here are some excerpts:

    

Free Resources From All My Books

Every few months, I reprint this post so that new subscribers learn about these resources.

I have many free resources, including excerpts and student hand-outs, available from all my books. Clicking on the covers will lead you to them (and look for two new forthcoming books – another one on ELLs that Katie Hull and I are writing, and a fourth in my student motivation series):

ellcommoncore-1cw29sdddsmall

book-cover-117y0771

classroom-management-qa-larry-ferlazzo1

Helping Students Motivate Themselves: Practical Answers To Classroom Problems.
 

 

    

More Recent Articles


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