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  1. A Look Back: The Importance Of Saying “I’m Sorry” To Students
  2. The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll — 2016
  3. National Park Service Makes 100,000 Public Domain Photos Available
  4. “eMargin” Lets You Annotate Text & Website – & Share Those Annotations
  5. Today Is The Eleventh Anniversary Of Hurricane Katrina Making Landfall – Here Are Related Resources
  6. More Recent Articles
  7. Search Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…
  8. Prior Mailing Archive

A Look Back: The Importance Of Saying “I’m Sorry” To Students

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Next February, this blog will be celebrating its ten-year anniversary! Leading up to it, I’m re-starting a series I tried to do in the past called “A Look Back.” Each week, I’ll be re-posting a few of my favorite posts from the past ten years.

I originally shared this post in 2009. You might also be interested in A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009.

In addition, since this original post, I’ve published The Best Resources On The Importance Of Saying “I’m Sorry”

I am human. I sometimes have bad days, or display a short temper in the classroom. I try to keep in mind The Best Piece Of Classroom Management Advice I’ve Ever Read (Will what I am about to do or say bring me closer or will it push me away farther from the person with whom I am communicating?), but sometimes don’t remember in time. When that happens, I try to remember to say:

“I’m sorry.”

Actually, I try to remember to say more than that, and the best description of the formula I try to use comes from an article about how nurses should make apologies to patients (The power of apology: how saying sorry can leave both patients and nurses feeling better). The writer uses the description:

“regret, reason and remedy”

For example, today I was a bit sharp with two students who were paired-up to do some work in my mainstream ninth-grade English class, but, instead, were just sitting there while everyone else in class was focusing on the task at hand — taking turns reading a passage to one another. A few minutes later I came back to them and simply said, “I’m sorry I barked at you earlier. You’re both excellent students, and I was frustrated that you weren’t doing what I had asked you to do. I could have said so in a better way, and I’ll try to show more patience in the future.”

It was, in effect, a use of the “regret, reason, and remedy” formula — though I hadn’t actually read that article until I started doing a little research later today on the Web about saying “I’m sorry.”

I find that saying sincere “I’m sorry’s” in this way can go a long way in strengthening my relationships with students, and using that kind of three part formula can help communicate that sincerity. I don’t feel a need to extract any kind of admission of fault from the student because I’m just taking responsibility for my own behavior.

These “I’m sorry’s,” I think (hope), can also act as models for students on how they might consider acting in multiple situations. I’m not sure how many adults in the world they see apologizing — especially apologizing to young people.

What has been your experience saying “I’m sorry” to students?

    

The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll — 2016

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Every year for the past 48 years, Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup have done a Poll On Education issues (you can see my posts from previous years here). This year’s poll results were just released, though I haven’t had time to thoroughly review them yet.

One finding that clearly stands-out is that respondents overwhelming feel that schools should not be closed (see The Best Posts & Articles On The Impact Of School Closures — Suggest More!).

Here are what seem to me to be the most thoughtful reflections on the survey by those who have had a chance to review it (I’ll add more as they come in):

Of course, you’ll want to start off by visiting the PDK site itself and, at least, review its summary.

Vast Majority of Americans Want Failing Schools Fixed, Not Closed, Poll Finds is from Education Week.

Four charts reveal what Americans think about the biggest education fights, including school closures and opt out is from New York Chalkbeat.

What’s the Purpose of Education? Public Doesn’t Agree on the Answer is from NEA Today.

    

National Park Service Makes 100,000 Public Domain Photos Available

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The Open Parks Network has made tens of thousands of images available to the public in a searchable database. Almost all are in the public domain, but there may be a few that don’t have a “Public Domain Mark.”

I’m adding it to The Best Online Sources For Images.

Thanks to Open Culture for the tip.

    

“eMargin” Lets You Annotate Text & Website – & Share Those Annotations

emargin

eMargin is a free tool developed by Birmingham City University in the United Kingdom.

You can upload any text and have students annotate it, and the same text can be annotated by a closed group. In addition, you can “upload” a web address and annotate it, as well. The lay-out can be a bit funky with websites, but it’s still workable.

I’m adding it to Best Applications For Annotating Websites.

    

Today Is The Eleventh Anniversary Of Hurricane Katrina Making Landfall – Here Are Related Resources


More Recent Articles


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