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  1. All My Ed Week Posts On Brain-Based Learning In One Place!
  2. USDE Unveils “Teach To Lead”: Do We Really Need Another Online Community To Promote Teacher Leadership?
  3. “If you’re observant about things happening around you, there are insights waiting to be discovered”
  4. New Resources On Students & Sleep
  5. “Education Is Not ‘Moneyball’: Why Teachers Can’t Trust Value-Added Evaluations Yet”
  6. More Recent Articles
  7. Search Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day...
  8. Prior Mailing Archive

All My Ed Week Posts On Brain-Based Learning In One Place!

My latest Education Week Teacher column brings together all my posts on brain-based learning — in one place!

Here’s an excerpt from one of them:

All-educators-need-to

    


USDE Unveils “Teach To Lead”: Do We Really Need Another Online Community To Promote Teacher Leadership?

teachtolead

Education Secretary Arne Duncan today announced a new site that is supposed to promote teacher leadership and develop some kind of online community. It’s called Commit To Lead and is part of Teach To Lead, which in turn is connected to RESPECT program he announced earlier this year (you can read about that program in a post by Barnett Berry and another one by Stephen Lazar).

With all the online teacher communities already available (particularly the Center For Teaching Quality Collaboratory), it’s hard for me to believe that we really need another one.

The cynical side of me says that Secretary Duncan’s stepping back a bit from standardized testing last week and this renewed focus on teacher leadership has more to do with turn-out for the mid-term elections than anything else, but I hope I’m wrong.

Hope springs eternal, so I’m adding this info to The Best Posts, Articles & Videos On “Teacher Leadership.”

    

“If you’re observant about things happening around you, there are insights waiting to be discovered”

Parking Behavior May Reflect Economic Drive is the title of an NPR piece on a new study suggesting that a nation’s economic health can be evaluated by if its drivers back-in or drive-forward into a parking space.

The study itself has big enough holes through which you could drive a truck, but that’s not that important for how I envision using it in my International Baccalaureate Theory of Knowledge class when we study human sciences.

The key point is made by NPR’s science correspondent at the end:

What-I-find-really

I think I’m going to have my TOK students read the NPR piece and many of the comments (while also looking at the issue of causation versus correlation), and then have them design a simple experiment (that they wouldn’t actually carry out) based on what they see around them and, at the same time, look at it through the lens of causation versus correlation.

For example, they could design an experiment studying if students who arrive last at their classes have lower grades than those who arrive first or if teachers who arrive at school forty-five minutes earlier at school are “better” teachers than those who arrive fifteen minutes earlier. Then, they could also discuss how causation versus correlation would fit into it.

What do you think? Are there ways I could make it a better lesson?

    


New Resources On Students & Sleep

“Education Is Not ‘Moneyball’: Why Teachers Can’t Trust Value-Added Evaluations Yet”


More Recent Articles


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