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"The Contemporary Calvinist" - 5 new articles

  1. This Week in Calvinism - November 21, 2014
  2. The Bible doesn't make BuzzFeed's list of books that could make the world a better place
  3. Interactive timeline on the inerrancy of scripture
  4. This Week in Calvinism - November 14, 2014
  5. A dangerous religion
  6. More Recent Articles
  7. Search The Contemporary Calvinist
  8. Prior Mailing Archive

This Week in Calvinism - November 21, 2014

    

The Bible doesn't make BuzzFeed's list of books that could make the world a better place

I don't spend a lot of time on BuzzFeed, but every once in a while a link will catch my attention. Like "21 Books That Could Make The World A Better Place." Here are the books that made the list:
  1. Reason for Hope by Jane Goodall
  2. Sold by Patricia McCormick
  3. Night by Elie Wiesel
  4. A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beah
  5. A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini
  6. Long Walk to Freedom by Nelson Mandela
  7. The Big Necessity by Rose George
  8. Room by Emma Donoghue
  9. Les Misérables by Victor Hugo
  10. The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch
  11. The Four Agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz
  12. Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer
  13. If I Just Had Two Wings by Virginia Frances Schwartz
  14. His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman
  15. Quiet by Susan Cain
  16. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
  17. How to Lie With Statistics by Darrell Huff
  18. The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls
  19. Siddhartha by Herman Hesse
  20. The Tao of Pooh by Benjamin Hoff
  21. Walden by Henry David Thoreau
Naturally, the only book that actually could make the world a better place didn't make the list.
    

Interactive timeline on the inerrancy of scripture


From Moses to the Chicago Statement on Biblical Inerrancy. View the interactive timeline here.
    

This Week in Calvinism - November 14, 2014

  • Now this is a new one. Steve Tassi believes the parable of the good Samaritan refutes Calvinism. He writes, "Jesus clearly makes the moral argument, that you are committing an immoral act when you do not help someone or simply pass by one who is unable to help themselves." Tassi goes on to argue that since Calvinists believe God passes by totally depraved sinners who cannot help themselves, then God is immoral by his own standards, and Calvinism can't be biblical. Surprisingly, Tassi is not a universalist.

  • The Seeking Disciple is an honest Arminian who is consistent in his theology when he preaches to the lost. He wants Calvinists to do the same. He writes, "[Calvinists] simply end by pleading with the lost to come to faith in Christ and be saved when in fact they should be preaching, 'Those of you who are regenerated, come to faith in Christ as proof of your divine election.'"

  • Mark Tooley, president of the Institute on Religion and Democracy, misses Mark Driscoll: "Maybe he will eventually reemerge chastened and wiser. Unapologetic, polemical, muscular Christianity is needed in every age to challenge sleeping, self-satisfied, apathetic religion." Did we not have muscular Christians before Driscoll?

  • You are not your own.

  • Nine steps to putting that sin to death.

  • Here's the trailer for Doug Wilson's upcoming book, Rules for Reformers.
    

A dangerous religion

More Recent Articles


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