Announcing a fall internship

I'm hiring one or two paid interns. It's a great opportunity to learn, to experiment and to get some hands on experience.

Find all the details right here. If you know someone who might be interested, I'd appreciate it if you would forward this to them.

       
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The end of everyone

I'm not sure if it was ever possible to say, "everyone loves ___," "everyone respects ___" or even, "everyone really doesn't like ___", but there's no doubt at all that this isn't true any more.

There is no more everyone. Instead, there are many pockets of someones.

       
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"I made it my mission..."

These are the people you want to hire, the people who will become linchpins, the people who will change your organization for the better. Not people who merely accept a mission, or grudgingly grind through a mission, but people who voluntarily choose to make something important their mission.

This post from Scott on iOS battery life is what I'm talking about.

Mission-driven beats compliant, every time.

       
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The best lesson from Fantasy Football's success

When people say, "my team," they mean it.

In the top-down world of industrial marketing, the San Francisco 49ers say, "we built this team, buy a ticket if you want to come."

Then, a few years later, it broadened to, "you should buy a jersey so you can be part of it."

In the sideways, modern world of peer-to-peer connection, people say, "my team has this player, that player and this defense." It belongs to them, because they built it. Everyone has their own team.

In neither case is the fan on the field, getting concussed or making the big decisions. It doesn't matter. What matters is that our feeling of ownership, of us-ness, is shifting. We want celebrities and brands and teams that do more than merely put on a show. In addition to the show, people want to believe that they own part of it.

       
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The idea is not the (only) hard part

In 1989, I created and launched a new idea: videotapes of people playing video games. It was ridiculed by the hipsters of the day, and my publisher later admitted that they hadn't even bothered to bring it to market beyond a few stores. A copycat product went on to sell a few million copies.

Today, Amazon paid a billion dollars for Twitch, which is precisely the same idea, used by millions of people every day. More than a billion hours have been spent/wasted on Twitch to date, I'm guessing.

I'm not going to hold my breath waiting for a commission check.

No, the hard part isn't merely thinking of an idea. Yes, it's hard to sit with a bunch of pre-teens while they record the underlying video, and hard to get it made and hard to get the first one published, the first time.

But the truly hard part is, 25 years later, sticking with it long enough for it to actually work.

       
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