NEXT WEEKS EVENTS 16th January to 22nd January 2017 The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.Monday Teme Valley Geol Soc ...

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"Geology in the West Country" - 5 new articles

  1. Next Week Monday 16th to Sunday 22nd January
  2. Early Scottish Fossil
  3. Courses by Dave Green
  4. Next Week Saturday 7th to Sunday 15th January 2017
  5. Courses by Nick Chidlaw
  6. More Recent Articles

Next Week Monday 16th to Sunday 22nd January

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

16th January to 22nd January 2017

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.

Monday

Teme Valley Geol Soc - Lecture
WhenMonday, 16 Jan 2017
WhereMartley Memorial Hall B4197 by Sports Ground (map)
DescriptionThe Anthropocene with Professor Ian Fairchild Contact Janet 01886 821061 Mem £1 Non £3

Tuesday

18:30
 Geological Society - Western Region
WhenTue, 17 January, 18:30 – 19:30
WhereTBC (map)
DescriptionRedcliffe Caves Tour

Wednesday



Thursday

19:30
 Dave Green's microscope course
WhenThu, 19 January, 19:30 – 21:30
WhereThe Chantry, Thornbury. (map)
DescriptionRocks and Minerals under the Microscope.  This 10 week course aims to introduce you to the identification and description of rocks and their component minerals under the petrological microscope. This is a practical course, each participant will be provided with a microscope and a set of thin sections of rocks, and will work through a course at their own pace. Held at The Chantry, Thornbury. First meeting 7.30 – 9.30, Thurs 12th January until March 23rd (not Thurs 16th Feb) in the Buckingham Room. Max. numbers 20, “first come, first served” due to number of slide sets. Cost £75


19:30
 Bath Geol Soc AGM
WhenThu, 19 January, 19:30 – 20:30
Where16 Queen Square, Bath (map)
DescriptionAnnual General Meeting 2017


19:30
 Thornbury Geology Group meeting
WhenThu, 19 January, 19:30 – 20:30
Description Thornbury Geology Group, The Chantry, Thornbury, 7.30pm, contact 01454 416882 The group is is an offshoot of Thornbury and District Museum and we welcome new members. Previous geological knowledge can be helpful but is not necessary as members are very willing to share their own knowledge with anyone keen to learn more about Earth Science. The group is loosely following a pre-recorded lecture series which is supplemented by use of other material and geological specimens. On occasions a guest speaker will talk on their specialist topic. Costs are met from attending members' monthly contributions and the group does not have membership subscriptions or a committee

Friday



Saturday

11:00
 South Wales Geologists' Association
WhenSat, 21 January, 11:00 – 12:00
WhereLectures at University of Wales Swansea are held in the department of Geography in the Wallace building. We meet on the landing area inside the main entrance to the building for refreshments with lectures in the main lecture theatre. (map)
DescriptionSaturday 21st January: (Swansea) Volcanic ash and rapid climate change, piecing together the past. Professor Siwan Davies (Swansea)

Sunday
    

Early Scottish Fossil

Tetrapod Evolution

An informed source has told me of a very interesting, and well written, article in the Guardian about fossil finds in Scotland. You can find it HERE.


Aytonerpeton microps, also known as “Tiny”. A fossil from the Early Carboniferous of Scotland. The rock was CT scanned and the head printed at twice "life" size. It is still in the rock!

    

Courses by Dave Green

Dave Green's Programme


It can be a little difficult to navigate Dave's website so the following slipped my notice until it was brought to my attention. The original can be found HERE.

Contact details for Dave are:-
Email Dave Green, dave@geostudies.freeserve.co.uk 

Rocks and Minerals under the Microscope. 

This 10 week course aims to introduce you to the identification and description of rocks and their component minerals under the petrological microscope. This is a practical course, each participant will be provided with a microscope and a set of thin sections of rocks, and will work through a course at their own pace. Held at The Chantry, Thornbury. First meeting 7.30 – 9.30, Thurs 12th January until March 23rd (not Thurs 16th Feb) in the Buckingham Room. Max. numbers 20, “first come, first served” due to number of slide sets. Cost £75


Tuesday evenings in the summer: Field Course: Tues 6th June - Tues 18th July June 2017 Geology and Landscape in Gloucestershire (evening field course Tuesdays 7-9 First meeting point:- Haresfield Beacon: Meet at the roadside pull-in just before the steep descent towards Haresfield village GR SO 824 090 . Further sessions on website, separate leaflet, and/or by contacting Dave Green.


Field Course February 2017 : probably a bit late for this but.... 
The Geology of Northern Sardinia Dates will be for a week to 10 days trip around a period from Fri 10th to Monday 20th . The two terranes making up Sardinia were separate parts of Gondwana during most of the Palaeozoic. They participated in the continental collisions at the start and end of the Carboniferous to produce the Variscan Orogenic Belt, across which it provides a classic cross-section showing different styles of folding and faulting, and different grades of metamorphism, together with the intrusion of vast volumes of granite. Following a long period of erosion it became a carbonate shelf environment during the Jurassic and Cretaceous. During the Tertiary and Quaternary, subduction of Tethys oceanic crust produced extensive volcanic activity. LET ME KNOW BEFORE CHRISTMAS IF YOU WANT TO COME to take advantage of cheaper air fares 

The Geology of the Oceans past and present (including plate tectonics, environments, and current/developing ideas on oceanography and marine geology). Often termed the last frontier to be explored on Earth, there have been great advances in our understanding of the oceanic realm over the past half century. This course aims to study the main developments and what we might expect in the future, based on current research. Monday 24th April, for 10 weeks, until 10th July (not 1st nor 29th May). Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30-9.30pm on Mondays. Cost £70. 
    

Next Week Saturday 7th to Sunday 15th January 2017

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

7th January to 15th January 2017



The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.


Saturday

South Wales Geologists' Association
WhenSat, 7 January, 11:00 – 16:00
WhereSaturday 7th January 2017: (Cardiff) Holiday Geology – 11:00 to 16:00 (map)
DescriptionSaturday 7th January 2017: (Cardiff) Holiday Geology – 11:00 to 16:00


Sunday



Monday



Tuesday


WEGA Lecture
WhenTue, 10 January, 19:30 – 20:30
WhereEarth Sciences Lecture Theatre, Wills Memorial Building, Park Street, Bristol (map)
DescriptionDr. Frances Cooper, Copper Porphyry deposits in Chile Tectonics, Climate, and Copper in the Central Andes The Atacama Desert, on the western side of the Central Andes in northern Chile is one of the driest places on Earth and is thought to have been dry since at least the middle Miocene. The region is also notable for its abundance of giant copper deposits, many of which have been enriched by the interaction with groundwater when the climate was wetter. It has been suggested that the onset of aridity in the region was caused by uplift of the Andes, which blocked moisture travelling from the east. However, others have suggested that the arid climate could have been established much earlier, long before Andean uplift. In my talk, I will explore the relationship between Andean uplift, aridity, and the end of copper enrichment in northern Chile, which is important not only for our understanding of tectonic and climatic processes, but also for mining company exploration strategies, and where they might seek to find the next “big one”.

Wednesday



Thursday



Friday



Saturday



Sunday


    

Courses by Nick Chidlaw

March 2017 – Two one-day courses – Scotland and Wales

Nick Chidlaw is offering two 1-day courses in March, using a format that has pleasingly attracted many attendees on previous occasions. These courses are indoor-based, and describe field areas to which Nick has run field courses in the past. One of them describes the striking geology and landforms of the north-west of the Scottish mainland between Durness and Skye, the other focuses on the deposition and subsequent deformation of the Late Carboniferous coal-bearing strata in the main south Wales coalfield. Coal seams and adjacent strata are rarely exposed, but are described here from extensive opencasts . The courses may be attractive particularly to people who are not in a position to visit field locations, e.g. insufficient time available because of family / work commitments, health problems, or may be interested in the opportunity to study lithologies from exposures that are no longer accessible / extant. Each course would comprise powerpoint-based lectures, together with examination of hand specimens of relevant mineral and rock types, and published geological maps of the field areas. The hand specimens have been collected by the tutor in the field areas described.


The venue is the Buckingham Room (single storey building by the car park) at The Chantry, 52 Castle Street,Thornbury, South Glos. BS351HB. Tel: (01454) 414268. See venue website for further details, including location map.
On each course attendees would bring their own packed lunch and other refreshments, or go into the town for lunch.
These two 1-day courses have a fee of £25.00 each.
If you / anyone else you know would like to attend either or both of these offered courses please contact Nick Chidlaw   
Please note: these courses are to run on the same weekend, but are independent of each other: you can enrol on both if you wish to, or either one of them, according to your interests / availability.
The deadline for the minimum number (10) of enrolments is Saturday 4th February (4 weeks before the courses are due to run). Maximum number of attendees on each course 30. If the minimum number for each course is reached by this deadline, the arrangements will be able to continue; if not, the course(s) not reaching viability will be cancelled, and fees received will be returned to those who have sent them in, soon after. Enrolments above the minimum number for each course will be able to continue up to 1 week before it is due to run.

Field Geology in North West Scotland

Saturday 4th March 10.00 am – 5.00 pm


This course focuses on the bedrock geology of the mainland of north-west Scotland; the area includes the oldest rocks in the British Isles and some of the oldest exposed on the surface of the earth. The youngest are of Early Ordovician age, but these crop out over a relatively small area, and the majority of the rocks seen are of Precambrian age. Huge (and frankly unimaginable) lengths of time are represented. It is undoubtedly the most complex geology in the British Isles, but also the most striking and fascinating. The landforms associated with this geology are impressive: particularly notable is the almost treeless ice-scoured plateau of the coastal fringe, studded with small lochs and intervening rounded hillocks, and the isolated fin-like mountains rising up from this a few miles inland. It is a very different place from anywhere else in the British Isles.
A key feature of north west Scottish geology is that a major part of it developed when the earth was a radically different planet to that seen today. This includes the stability of the crust (more fluid), allowing magmatic activity and deformation to be more extensive; also the composition of the atmosphere (carbon dioxide rich with little oxygen) allowing different sedimentary rocks to form e.g.. Banded Iron Formations (BIF’s). Another key feature of the geology is its provenance, which belongs to that of Canada, Greenland and northern Scandinavia (all of which were at one time joined together) rather than much of the rest of the British Isles. Along the entire eastern margin of the study area is an enormous and impressive complex of stacked thrust sheets containing associated rocks such as mylonites, which developed during the Caledonian mountain-building in Silurian times, and known as the Moine Thrust Zone.        
A handout outlining the day’s programme, and a list of optional suggested reading, will be provided on the course. No prior knowledge of geology or the study are is assumed.

Late Carboniferous Coal-bearing strata in south Wales: natural exposures, quarries and opencast mines 

Sunday 5th March 10.00 am – 5.00 pm


During the Carboniferous period (359 – 299 million years ago) conditions became established for the first time for coal deposition to occur on a global scale. Coal-bearing strata were laid down in a variety of latitudes and under a variety of climates: in the northern hemisphere mostly during Carboniferous times, and in the southern hemisphere mostly in the following Permian period ( 299 - 252 million years ago). This has left a legacy of major coal deposits distributed widely across our present continents. Although land plants had evolved to form the first forests during the preceding Devonian period, it was during the Carboniferous period when they became widely distributed on earth; this, coupled with the persistent development of mires across extensive areas, allowed peat deposits to form time and again, during burial these converted to coal.
Our understanding of the deposition of coal-bearing strata has been hugely increased by the mining of coal as an energy resource, particularly from the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution in Britain and Europe in the 18th century. Britain has an abundance of coal-bearing strata, and this was extensively mined until alternative resources of energy and economic globalisation increased from the early 20th century; today, large-scale deep mining is no longer operational in Britain, but extensive opencast mines continue to work, mostly in Scotland with some in Wales and England.
On this course, you will be introduced to the deposition of the coal-bearing strata of Late Carboniferous age in Britain, and their deformation during the mountain-building events (Variscan Orogeny) at the end of the period. The tutor has run field courses in south Wales where opportunities to study the main coal-bearing strata and their deformation have existed in huge opencast coal operations, and where those rocks exposed are no longer accessible or extant. Such locations, which include bituminous and anthracitic coal seams up to around 2 metres thick, will be illustrated from photographs taken at the time of the visits. Other locations including natural exposures, working and disused quarries and track cuttings, will also be described to provide a stratigraphic coverage up through the coal – bearing strata.  
A handout outlining the day’s programme, and a list of optional suggested reading, will be provided on the course. No prior knowledge of geology or the study are is assumed.
    

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