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"Geology in the West Country" - 5 new articles

  1. Teaching & Learning in Geoscience Education: Summer School 2015!
  2. Comet 67P
  3. Winter 2015 Distance Learning Courses
  4. Current Vacancy - Gloucestershire Geology Trust
  5. 19th November - Webinar: Recent Developments in the Regulation of Small-Scale Liquefaction Facilities
  6. More Recent Articles
  7. Search Geology in the West Country
  8. Prior Mailing Archive

Teaching & Learning in Geoscience Education: Summer School 2015!

 Photo from very successful 2014 summer school

Teaching & Learning in Geoscience Education: summer school 2015!
If you know anyone that might be interested in attending:
- there are 11 bursary places available
- the dates are Saturday 18th–Friday 24th July 2015
- fieldwork focus module, 22nd–23rd August and 24th–25th October
Click here for further details and an application form
Applications for both modules are welcomed now.
    


Comet 67P

The comet 67P being investigated by the Rosetta and Philae space craft has this spectacular cliff-face with cobbles appparently sticking out of finer material.  The resolution of the original image is about 1-2 metres/pixel.  These boulders may be 10-20 metres across.  The similarity to boulder-clay inclusions, or Budleigh Salterton pebbles, though much, much bigger, poses questions as to how they formed in the comet.  They definitely look sub-rounded or ellipsoidal or oblate.  What erosion process could hew such large boulders? And then emplace them in the matrix.  They seem to have previously been internal to the matrix, but exposed now.  The comet may have originated as part of a much bigger planet with gravity and atmosphere to allow boulders to be formed.
Sent to the blog by Richard.
    

Winter 2015 Distance Learning Courses


Current Vacancy - Gloucestershire Geology Trust

Role: Head of Geology
Part time with possibility of going up to full time.
Self-employed basis

We require a person for 1-2 day a week to help run the office and lead on a few part time areas of work. The candidate will be someone who is both geologically competent, as well as a good organiser and self-motivated. They would need to be located in, or very close to the County and have some familiarity with the Geology of the local area.
The majority of the work would be independent but with the support and help of a dozen or so board members and volunteers. The role would be based in our office in Brockworth, Gloucester and from time to time would require outdoor work.
It has the potential to expand into a full time role if the person is successful in fundraising!
For further information please contact Mark Campbell

Main Responsibilities:
- Administrative tasks (updating memberships, responding to public queries, arranging postage of purchases of trail guides)
- Organising events and liaising with partner charities and organisations
-  Managing and directing volunteer help in the office and at events
- Attending conservation days at a range of sites
- Maintaining fossil collection with volunteer help
- Fundraising for projects
- Checking status of RIGS (Regionally Important Geological Sites), and maintaining the GIS database with volunteer help
- Arranging agendas and minutes for board meetings
- Keeping the SAGE financial information up to date
Key Skills Required
- Geological knowledge
- Excellent communication skills
- Organisation and self-motivation
- Ability to use Microsoft Office package
Desired Skills
- Experience leading group work / teaching
- Website maintenance
- Fundraising experience
    

19th November - Webinar: Recent Developments in the Regulation of Small-Scale Liquefaction Facilities

Van Ness Feldman LLP and B2Bwebinars.net are pleased to announce our upcoming interactive web conference, Recent Developments in the Regulation of Small-Scale Liquefaction Facilities . The webinar will be held on Wednesday, November 19, 2014 from 1:00 - 2:30 PM ET.The regulation of small-scale liquefied natural gas (LNG) facilities has taken on greater significance in recent months, primarily as a result of growing commercial interest in pursuing these projects to capitalize on abundant domestic shale gas supplies. Two experienced practitioners will discuss the role of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and U.S. Department of Transportation's Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) in regulating these types of LNG facilities.
The topics covered will include the extent of FERC's jurisdiction, the applicability of PHMSA's minimum federal safety standards, and the potential impact of state safety requirements.
    


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