Next Week 5th to 12th December 2016 NEXT WEEKS EVENTS 28th November to 4th December 2016 The following is an extract from Bristol Geology CalendarMore details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or ...

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"Geology in the West Country" - 5 new articles

  1. * Next Week 5th to 12th December 2016 ...
  2. Siccar Point - the birthplace of modern geology
  3. Water in the mantle
  4. Field Course on the Lizard
  5. Next Week 28th November to 4th December 2016
  6. More Recent Articles

* Next Week 5th to 12th December 2016 ...

Next Week 5th to 12th December 2016

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS


28th November to 4th December 2016

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.

Monday

19:30
 Dave Green - Palaeontology and Evolution
WhenMon, 5 December, 19:30 – 22:30
WhereWynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester (map)
DescriptionPalaeontology and Evolution. This will be a mainly practical class, focussing on the preservation, identification and classification of fossils, and an account of the evolution of life on Earth. Starts Mon 19th September for 10 weeks (not 17th or 24th Oct), until 5th December Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30-9.30pm on Mondays. Cost £70 (including tea, coffee etc at breaktime!).

Tuesday

18:30
 Geological Society - Western Region
WhenTue, 6 December, 18:30 – 19:30
WhereUniversity Walk, Queen's Building, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TR, UK (map)
DescriptionChristmas Social: Geological Quiz and Meal

Wednesday

19:30
 South Glos Mines Research Group - Talk
WhenWed, 7 December, 19:30 – 21:00
WhereMiners Institute (aka Coalpit Heath Village Hall), 214 Badmington Rd, Coalpit Heath, BS36 2QB (map)
DescriptionBristol Locomotive Builders: 1841-1958 - Dr Martin Murray and David Martin For details contact Roger Gosling tel. 01454 883607

Thursday



Friday

19:00
 Cheltenham Mineral and Geological Society
WhenFri, 9 December, 19:00 – 21:00
WhereShurdington at The Century Hall (map)
Description Sale, Quiz, and Raffle

Saturday

11:00
 South Wales Geologists' Association - Lecture
WhenSat, 10 December, 11:00 – 12:00
WhereLectures at Cardiff University are held in the Department of Earth Sciences in the "Main Building". We meet in the Earth Sciences staff room and lectures are held in Lecture Theatre 1.25. (map)
DescriptionSaturday 10th December: (Cardiff) From the depths: How cave precipitates (speleotherms) tell us about past environments and climates. Professor Ian Fairchild (Birmingham)

Sunday
    

Siccar Point - the birthplace of modern geology

The Geological Survey explains Siccar Point


A rather good video concerning Siccar Point - one of the birthplaces of (British) geology. Click the full screen button at the bottom right of the video.

 






    

Water in the mantle

Water in the mantle

New Scientist has an article about water (well actually hydroxyl ions) in the mantle and at a considerable depth - 1,000 km. All from a tiny inclusion in a diamond.



You can find the article HERE.
    

Field Course on the Lizard

PROPOSED 4 DAY FIELD COURSE "FIELD GEOLOGY ON THE LIZARD PENINSULA, CORNWALL"

Nick Chidlaw is proposing to lead the above course in June 2017. details below the photo.


Kynance Cove, near Lizard village

Lifelong Learning 4 day course

Field Geology on the Lizard Peninsula, Cornwall



June 2017: Sunday 25th – Wednesday 28th
10.00 am – 5.00 pm each day. 

The Lizard is composed of metamorphic rocks formed in a plate collision zone during Devonian and Carboniferous times. Much of the peninsula consists of what is widely recognised as parts of ancient ocean crust, the remainder being altered sediments (including some formed by underwater landslides), discrete igneous intrusions and slices of older crustal basement. These rocks, of which serpentine is the most famous, are superbly exposed in cliffs and quarries in a highly attractive coastal setting.  

No prior knowledge of the area or geology is assumed.

Please note you will need to make your own travel and accommodation arrangements, with meeting times and places to be confirmed.  

The course is organised through Cardiff University. If carries assessment, which is very difficult to fail!  Attendees usually find assessment on these courses useful for consolidating what they have learned.

Tuition fee is £160.00  (concessionary fee available £128.00).

Enrolments can be made by ‘phoning 029  2087  0000  or see website www.cardiff.ac.uk/learn

For more information on course content and specific locations, contact tutor
    

Next Week 28th November to 4th December 2016

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS


28th November to 4th December 2016

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.

Monday

19:30
 Dave Green - Palaeontology and Evolution
WhenMon, 28 November, 19:30 – 22:30
WhereWynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester (map)
DescriptionPalaeontology and Evolution. This will be a mainly practical class, focussing on the preservation, identification and classification of fossils, and an account of the evolution of life on Earth. Starts Mon 19th September for 10 weeks (not 17th or 24th Oct), until 5th December Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30-9.30pm on Mondays. Cost £70 (including tea, coffee etc at breaktime!).

Tuesday



Wednesday

19:30               Bristol Nats Geology Lecture - Deserts and Dinosaur Discoveries
WhenWed, 30 November, 19:30 – 21:00
WhereS H Reynolds lecture Theatre, Wills Memorial Building, University of Bristol, BS8 1RJ (map)
DescriptionDeserts and Dinosaur Discoveries Dr Cindy Howells Wednesday 30 November, 7.30pm Wales is geologically diverse, and well known for its rich Palaeozoic fauna, but the recent discovery of a new dinosaur has highlighted the importance of the local Mesozoic sections. Cindy Howells is the Palaeontology Curator at the National Museum of Wales and is well qualified to talk about recent dinosaur discoveries in South Wales and the world in which these animals lived. The meeting will take place in the S H Reynolds lecture Theatre, Wills Memorial Building, University of Bristol, BS8 1RJ. For those unfamiliar with this venue: Enter the Wills Building via main entrance under the University Tower, let the people on the desk know that you have come for the BNS meeting and walk ahead between the two staircases. Turn right when you reach some display cases. The lecture room is on your left.

Thursday

19:30
 Bath Geol Soc Lecture
WhenThu, 1 December, 19:30 – 20:30
Where16 Queen Square, Bath (map)
DescriptionFirst Footfall: the Colonisation of Land Dr. Ken McNamara, Sedgwick Museum, University of Cambridge The colonisation of land and the establishment of terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems was one of the most important events in the evolution of life. Yet we have a poor understanding of the identities of the colonisers, how they interacted with one another and even exactly when it happened. The early Silurian (about 430 million years) Tumblagooda Sandstone in the Southern Carnarvon Basin in Western Australia contains a rich trace fossil fauna that has the potential to shed much light on the identities of the first colonisers of land. Deposited before vascular plants had evolved on land, the extensive fossil trackways and burrows comprise a range of trace fossils attributed mainly to arthropods, but their exact identity remains enigmatic. The arthropod tracks range in size from a few millimetres to more than 30cm in width; some extendfor many metres. These larger forms must have been made by animals well in excess of 1 metre in length. Candidates for these first colonizers include the giant scorpion-like eurypterids, euthycarcinoids and synziphosurids. A number of different types of burrows have been described that have been interpreted as dwelling, feeding and hunting burrows. Study of the associations of different burrow types is enabling the trophic structure of this early terrestrial ecosystem to be established. Finally, in this talk I will also describe how the Tumblagooda Sandstone provides evidence for oldest known land animal and the earliest evidence for the presence of vertebrates on land.

Friday



Saturday

OUGS - Severnside - Day of Lectures
WhenSaturday, 3 Dec 2016
WhereYMCA Conference Centre, Mendalgief Road, Newport NP20 2HF. (map)
DescriptionDay of Lectures Our Day of Lectures will take place at the YMCA Conference Centre, Mendalgief Road, Newport NP20 2HF. Contact: Jan Ashton-Jones [janaj1009@gmail.com]

Sunday


    

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