Book Watch: This Brutal World by Peter Chadwick and more


Book Watch: This Brutal World by Peter Chadwick

Graphic designer and photographer Peter Chadwick’s new book This Brutal World is, as he writes in the introduction, “an homage to Brutalism and a visual manifesto that celebrate this awe-inspiring style of architecture.” The 224-page is a love letter of sorts, and brims with black-and-white photographs of Brutalist buildings—320, to be precise.

large_this-brutal-world-phaidon-architecture-brutalist-book large_this-brutal-world-brutalist-architecture-russia large_this-brutal-world-brutalism-architecture-book-randolph-zaha large_this-brutal-world-brutalism-architecture-book-joy-divisionlarge_this-brutal-world-phaidon-book-review-2

Facts derived from Curbed; Photos by Nara Shin of Cool Hunting.

Save

Save

Save

Save

The post Book Watch: This Brutal World by Peter Chadwick appeared first on Modernica Blog.

    

Inspire Me Monday: The Floating Piers

Eighty-one year-old conceptual artist Christo has done it again, with a massive interactive installation that is attracting tourists like flies to Lake Iseo in Italy. For sixteen days – June 18 through July 3, 2016 (weather permitting) – Lake Iseo is being reimagined. 100,000 square meters of shimmering yellow fabric, carried by a modular floating dock system of 220,000 high-density polyethylene cubes, undulate with the movement of the waves as The Floating Piers rise just above the surface of the water.

Christo-Floating-Piers-Italy_03 christo-12 BN-ON508_BERETT_M_20160617111743 17christo-angle-superJumbo 17christo-2-superJumbo-v317christoItem-superJumbo

Photos courtesy of the New York Times and Wall Street Journal.

Save

Save

The post Inspire Me Monday: The Floating Piers appeared first on Modernica Blog.

    

Macrame at the Showroom

Last Sunday, the DIY experts at Modern Macrame put together a workshop at our Los Angeles Showroom, much to the delight of all attendees and our staff! The event proved entertaining and informative for all; see photos below. You can sign up for our mailing list to stay in the know for future events!

Photo Jun 19, 8 06 31 PM

Photo Jun 19, 7 05 42 PM  Photo Jun 19, 8 46 17 PM Photo Jun 19, 8 53 17 PM Photo Jun 19, 8 58 33 PMimage1

Save

Save

Save

The post Macrame at the Showroom appeared first on Modernica Blog.

    

The Frank Lloyd Wright Legacy, Part 1: Bloodlines

The architect who is heralded by many as the greatest modern architect of all time touched the world of architecture in countless ways. Besides the fact that his groundbreaking ideas changed the world of design forever, Lloyd Wright’s work and instruction at both of his Taliesin studios influenced scores of architects that went on to become some of the best and brightest in the industry.

TaliesinWest2010

Taliesin West in Scottsdale Arizona, 1937. Photo by Andrew Horne.

Even though his personal life was tumultuous and sometimes tragic, two of Lloyd Wright’s sons and two of his grandchildren followed his footsteps into the world of architecture. Here is a look at their work:

Frank Lloyd Wright, Jr.

The eldest son of Frank Lloyd Wright senior and his first wife, Catherine Lee Tobin, Lloyd Wright, Jr. studied architecture and landscape architecture briefly before jumping into the working world in Southern California in 1911. Although he specialized in landscapes, Lloyd Wright, Jr. worked in architecture as well, often hand in hand with the likes of Irving Gill, Rudolf Schindler, and of course, his father.

frank-lloyd-wright-lloyd-wright-grandson

Frank Lloyd Wright, Jr. (right) with father Frank Lloyd Wright senior and son John Lloyd Wright.

Junior2

Wayfarers Chapel in Rancho Palos Verdes, CA – 1949. Photo courtesy of Fine Art America.

Junior3

The Sowden House (aka The Black Dahlia House) in Hollywood, 1926. Photo courtesy of House Crazy.

Junior4

Frank Lloyd Wright senior’s Millard House with landscape design by Lloyd Wright, Jr. Photo courtesy of Millardhouse.com.

John Lloyd Wright

Despite the fact that John Lloyd Wright’s relationship with his father was decidedly rocky, the architecture giant’s second-eldest son nonetheless followed in his father’s footsteps after a brief stint as a toy designer. John left his mark in both worlds, designing the famous Lincoln Logs toys before moving on to architecture, where he contributed to both the Prairie School and International Styles.

JLW portrait copy

Photo courtesy of Wikipedia.

JLW

Frank E. Compton House in La Jolla, CA – 1948. Photo by Julius Shulman.

JLW3

Cookson House in San Fernando, CA – 1958. Photo by Charles Schneider.

JLW2

MacPherson Studio House in Del Mar, CA – 1947. Photo courtesy of Modern San Diego.

Elizabeth Wright Ingraham

John Lloyd Wright’s daughter also seemed to exhibit the designer genes of her grandfather. She studied architecture with Mies van der Rohe at the Armour Institute and also attended the University of California at Berkeley before apprenticing at her grandfather’s famous architecture program at Taliesin. After settling with her husband in Colorado during the 1940s, Wright Ingraham designed hundreds of buildings in and around Colorado.

ewi

Elizabeth Wright Ingraham with husband, Gordon Ingraham. Photo courtesy of The Gazette.

EWI4

Fountain Library in Colorado, 2005. Photo courtesy of The Gazette.

EWI3

Solaz house in Manitou Springs, CO – 1969.  Photo courtesy of The Gazette.

EWI2

Beadle House in Colorado Springs, 1951. Photo courtesy of The Gazette.

Eric Lloyd Wright

Another grandchild of Frank Lloyd Wright, Eric Lloyd Wright was born to Lloyd Wright, Jr. in 1929. After graduating from UCLA, he immediately began working with his father and grandfather at Taliesin and Taliesin West. He later founded his own architectural firm Eric Lloyd Wright Architects and Planners, which is still practicing today.

3e50bfab59d9c83f2d334fbe888530c5 copy

Eric Lloyd Wright with grandfather Frank Lloyd Wright. Photo courtesy of Wikipedia.

ELW4

Good Shepherd Community Church in Des Plaines, ME – 1960. Photo courtesy of Revitalize Des Plaines.

ELW3

Ross House in Silver Lake, CA – 1957. Photo courtesy of Michael Locke.

ELW2

Santaranta in Finland, 2011. Photo courtesy of the Embassy of Finland.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

The post The Frank Lloyd Wright Legacy, Part 1: Bloodlines appeared first on Modernica Blog.

    

Architecture Spotlight: Mid-Century Mexico

hotel_boca_chica_acapulco_mexico_2

Hotel Chica Boca in Acapulco, designed by Antonio Peles during the 1950s. Photo courtesy of MODern deSIGN.

bocachica8523low

Hotel Chica Boca in Acapulco, designed by Antonio Peles during the 1950s. Photo courtesy of MODern deSIGN.

boca-chica-exterior-building-view-a-01-x2-3

Hotel Chica Boca in Acapulco, designed by Antonio Peles during the 1950s. Photo courtesy of MODern deSIGN.

boca-chica-11

Hotel Chica Boca in Acapulco, designed by Antonio Peles during the 1950s. Photo courtesy of MODern deSIGN.

Cetto

Casa Cetto in Mexico City, designed in 1951 by Max Cetto. Photo courtesy of Life Magazine.

EPSON MFP image

Casa Cetto in Mexico City, designed in 1951 by Max Cetto. Photo courtesy of Una Vida Moderna.

EPSON MFP image

Casa Cetto in Mexico City, designed in 1951 by Max Cetto. Photo courtesy of Una Vida Moderna.

Cetto2

Casa Cetto in Mexico City, designed in 1951 by Max Cetto. Photo courtesy of Life Magazine.

EscuelaNo1

Escuela Normal Nº 1 in Toluca, designed in 1966 by Gustavo Gallo Carpio and Angel Azorín Poch. Photo courtesy of Una Vida Moderna.

EscuelaNo1-2

Escuela Normal Nº 1 in Toluca, designed in 1966 by Gustavo Gallo Carpio and Angel Azorín Poch. Photo courtesy of Una Vida Moderna.

EscuelaNo3 copy

Escuela Normal Nº 1 in Toluca, designed in 1966 by Gustavo Gallo Carpio and Angel Azorín Poch. Photo courtesy of Una Vida Moderna.

Casa Galvez

Casa Galvez in San Angel, designed by Antonio Attolini in 1959. Photo courtesy of Una Vida Moderna.

Casa Galvez4

Casa Galvez in San Angel, designed by Antonio Attolini in 1959. Photo courtesy of Una Vida Moderna.

Casa Galvez3

Casa Galvez in San Angel, designed by Antonio Attolini in 1959. Photo courtesy of Una Vida Moderna.

Casa Galvez2

Casa Galvez in San Angel, designed by Antonio Attolini in 1959. Photo courtesy of Una Vida Moderna.

Save

Save

Save

Save

The post Architecture Spotlight: Mid-Century Mexico appeared first on Modernica Blog.

    

More Recent Articles


Click here to safely unsubscribe from "Modernica Blog."
Click here to view mailing archives, here to change your preferences, or here to subscribePrivacy