THE PEARL THEATRE COMPANY PRESENTS 'THE WINTER’S TALE’ DIRECTED BY MICHAEL SEXTON, FEBRUARY 10–MARCH 15 ONLY and more...


THE PEARL THEATRE COMPANY PRESENTS 'THE WINTER’S TALE’ DIRECTED BY MICHAEL SEXTON, FEBRUARY 10–MARCH 15 ONLY

For Five Weeks Only . . .  New York’s Resident Classical Company The Pearl Theatre Company . . .  in association with the Shakespeare Society . . . .  presents Shakespeare’s Rare and Beautiful Tale of Late Romance . . . The Winter’s Tale . . . a wise and winsome fairytale, in which nothing is truly lost—certainly not love—if only we know where to seek it . . . Directed by Shakespeare Society Artistic Director Michael Sexton . . .   You know the story . . .  a moment of jealousy and an act of anger lead to a lifetime of regret for Leontes, the rash king who destroys his family on a whim . . .  But as time glides gently on, fate, love, and a few true friends, are ready to work wonders to restore happiness to his world . . . The cast includes Pearl Resident Acting Company (RAC) members Jolly Abraham (Hermione), Rachel Botchan (Paulina), Bradford Cover (Polixenes) and Dominic Cuskern (Shepherd/Antigonus). Company members are joined by Steve Cuiffo (Autolycus), Adam Green (Clown), Peter Francis James (Leontes), Tom Nelis (Camillo), Imani Jade Powers (Perdita) and James Udom (Florizel) . . . the creative team includes Brett J. Banakis (Sets), Bradley King (Lighting), Tilly Grimes (Costumes), John D. Ivy (Sound), Michael Palmer (Production Stage Manager) and original music composed by Raymond Bokhour . . . Preview Performances: Feb. 10 & 17 at 7pm; Feb. 11, 15, 18 & 21 2pm; Feb. 12-14 & 19-21 at 8pm
Opening Night Benefit Performance: Feb. 22 at 7pm . . . Regular Performances: Tuesday at 7pm; Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday at 2pm; and Thursday–Saturday at 8pm through March 15 . . . Curtain-Up Classics Informal Lecture: Saturday, Feb. 21, 11am, free . . . Tuesday Talkbacks with Cast & Crew: Tuesday Mar. 3 and Mar. 10, post-performance, free with admission . . . Actors’ Night ($20 Rush Tickets with any valid performance or design Union Card): Friday Feb 13, 8pm . . . School Night ($20 Rush Tickets for educators with a valid educator email address): Friday, Feb. 20, 8pm . . . Buzz Nights ($20 Rush Tickets and Free Beer): Thursdays, Feb. 12; Feb 19; Feb. 25; Mar 5; Mar 12

The Pearl Theatre (555 West 42nd Street)
Tickets are $65 ($50 previews, $39 seniors, $20 student rush, $20 Thursday rush, $100 Opening Night)
pearltheatre.org; 212.563.9261
2 hours, 30 minutes

Press contact: John Wyszniewski at Blake Zidell & Associates

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/ .  If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     

SNOWED IN? HERE’S WHAT TO WATCH, READ OR LISTEN TO

  

(from The New York Times, 1/26; via Pam Green.)

It’s too cold to go out. Your remote is working, but forget flipping though the channels: let us guide you. Your stereo is searching for something better than what you’re listening to now? You need a new book? We hear you. Here are our recommendations for what’s streaming on TV, what should be rocking your apartment and great reads to curl up with.

You want to be a detective:

CRACKER Long before David Tennant in “Broadchurch” or Matthew McConaughey in “True Detective,” Robbie Coltrane was perfecting the damaged crime solver as the criminal psychologist Fitz Fitzgerald in this mid-1990s British series. All 25 episodes are available at Acorn TV and Amazon.

THE FALL The second season of this dark British crime drama, set in Northern Ireland and starring Gillian Anderson, recently went up exclusively on Netflix. The two seasons represent a perfect one-day, 11-episode binge.

(Read more)

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/01/26/snowed-in-heres-what-to-watch-read-or-listen-to/?_r=0

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/ .  If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     

HOW SENECA BECAME ANCIENT ROME’S PHILOSOPHER-FIXER

 

(Elizabeth Kolbert’s article appeared in the New Yorker, 2/2.)

Sometime in the spring of the year 59, the emperor Nero decided to murder his mother. As you can imagine, the two were not on good terms. In a gesture designed to appear conciliatory, Nero invited his mother, Agrippina, to join him at a festival in Baiae, a resort town near present-day Naples. During the festivities, he treated her with great affection. Then, when it was time for her to leave, he presented her with a gift—a beautifully appointed boat to ferry her up the coast.

The gift was supposed to be a death trap. But just about everything that should have gone wrong didn’t. The deck of the ship fell in, yet, rather than killing Agrippina, it crushed one of her attendants. The hull, too, had been crafted to break apart; in all the confusion, though, it failed to do so. The rowers tried to overturn the ship. Once again, the effort fell short. Agrippina and a second attendant, Acerronia, swam free. Acerronia—“rather unwisely,” as Tacitus puts it—kept screaming that she was Agrippina and needed help. The rowers rushed over and bashed her on the head with their oars. The real Agrippina slipped away. She was picked up by a fishing boat and deposited safely onshore. When Nero learned that his mother had survived, he sent his minions to stab her.

(Read more)

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/02/02/stoic-2

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/ .  If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     

TRUTH LIES DIANA

(The following is a live interview with forensic investigator John Morgan on Talk Radio Europe, which aired 1/22—the interviewer is Bill Padley.  Addressed is the new book How They Murdered Princess Diana and also the West End play Truth Lies Diana currently showing at London’s Charing Cross Theatre. Via Patricia N. Saffran.)

  

 Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/ .  If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     

‘SAINT JOAN,’ BY GEORGE BERNARD SHAW (LISTEN ON BBC RADIO 3, STARTING, 1/25--LINK BELOW)

A Chronicle Play in Six Scenes and an Epilogue
by Bernard Shaw

Listen at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b015n063

It would be unthinkable not to include a new production of Saint Joan in Radio 3's Conviction season, which features new plays and classic drama about people with unwavering and uncompromising beliefs - and the consequences for those around them.

Shaw's Saint Joan is the embodiment of absolute conviction. Given, as she believes, a divine mission to lead the French to victory and nationhood, she is also divinely forbidden to shed a single drop of blood. Her only weapon is her belief, and the courage it puts into those around her. In Joan, Shaw presents us with a character of remarkable talent and unshakeable faith - but no grace - and reveals her fate at the hands of normal men and women who, as Shaw notes, do what they find they must do, in spite of their best intentions. Joan's convictions are contagious. They make her an unstoppable force. They also lead her to destruction. 'There were only two opinions about her', Shaw observes in his preface to the play, 'One that she was miraculous: the other that she was unbearable.'

Joan of Arc was canonised in 1920, a fact which galvanised Shaw to complete the play with which he had long been toying. A humane masterpiece, full of comedy, outrage, satire and anger, it examines the seismic changes in medieval society of which Joan was a precursor, for an audience themselves struggling with a shocking new post-war order. An immediate success, the play restored Shaw to universal popularity, helping him to the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1925, as the Academy observed, "for his work which is marked by both idealism and humanity, its stimulating satire often being infused with a singular poetic beauty".

The music is taken from 'The Armed Man: A Mass for Peace', by Karl Jenkins.

Credits

Role

Contributor

Writer

George Bernard Shaw

Joan (The Maid)

Lyndsey Marshal

Robert de Baudricourt/The Chaplain

Paul Ritter

The Archbishop of Rheims

Anton Lesser

The Duke of Tremouille/Inquisitor

Sean Baker

Charles, the Dauphin/Charles VII

Blake Ritson

Bluebeard/Brother Martin Ladvenu

Nyasha Hatendi

Captain La Hire/John d'Estivet

Daniel Rabin

Count of Dunois/de Poulengey

Trystan Gravelle

The Earl of Warwick

Jonathan Coy

Pierre Cauchon, Bishop of Beauvais

Paul Hilton

Thomas de Courcelles

Stuart McLoughlin

de Baudrincourt's Steward

Brian Bowles

Dunois's Page

Ryan Watson

Adaptor

Jonquil Panting

Producer

Jonquil Panting

Director

Jonquil Panting

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/ .  If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     


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