***** ‘PRODIJIG THE REVOLUTION’ FROM ALAN KENEFICK (SV PICK, IE) and more...


***** ‘PRODIJIG THE REVOLUTION’ FROM ALAN KENEFICK (SV PICK, IE)

 
 

(Mary Leland’s article appeared in the Irish Times, 7/27.)

Choreographer and creator Alan Kenefick’s experiment aims to bridge the genre-gap between, for example, Michael Jackson and traditional Irish dance. It’s this revolutionary thesis that energises the Opera House production.

When choreography has to carry a philosophical message the weight can become too heavy to bear, and in political terms, Prodijig comes close to sinking. Jettison that lode though and, on the physical evidence, no burden is too cumbersome for the troupe gathered here in an ensemble of miraculous stamina.

(Read more)

http://www.irishtimes.com/culture/stage/prodijig-the-revolution-review-irresistible-revolutionary-energy-1.2736062

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/. If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     


BEN BRANTLEY ON: ‘HARRY POTTER AND THE CURSED CHILD’

 
 

(Brantley’s article appeared in The New York Times, 7/25; via Pam Green.)

LONDON — Oh, for a wizard’s spell that would allow me to tell you everything, and then erase it completely from your memory. But though I paid rapt attention during the afternoon and evening I spent at “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child,” which opened in a blaze of outrageous enchantment on Monday night at the Palace Theater here, I failed to pick up on any recipe for inducing post-tell-all amnesia in Muggles, which is Potter-speak for nonwizards like you and me.

This eagerly anticipated, two-part, five-hour-plus sequel to J. K. Rowling’s best-selling, seven-volume series of “Harry Potter” novels is the kind of play that you want to describe in detail, if only to help you figure out how it achieves what is does. That would be a kind of magic that is purely theatrical yet somehow channels the addictive narrative grip of Ms. Rowling’s prose.

(Read more)

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/26/theater/review-harry-potter-and-the-cursed-child-casts-a-spell-onstage.html?em_pos=medium&emc=edit_cu_20160727&nl=theater-update&nl_art=0&nlid=68469194&ref=headline&te=1

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/. If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     


***** FELLOWES/HENEKER/STILES/DREWE: ‘HALF A SIXPENCE’ (SV PICK, UK)

 
 

(Dominic Cavendish’s article appeared in the Telegraph, 7/26.)

Flash, Bang, Wallop! What a turn-up for the books! Half a Sixpence, the larky musical that catapulted Tommy Steele into a different showbiz league over half a century ago, has been enhanced, re-sized, had all its blemishes removed and now looks pretty close to perfection. Someone – producer Sir Cameron Mackintosh, surely, who has had a close hand in this revival – should stick it pronto in the West End, where it hasn’t been seen since its initial 1963 run. 

Take a bow Julian Fellowes – he of Downton Abbey fame – who has done a sterling job scripting a new book, finding richer dramatic pickings in the 1905 HG Wells novel “Kipps”, and re-organising the story so that it no longer seems a broken-backed affair on stage. A bouquet apiece for composer George Stiles and lyricist Anthony Drewe who have diligently buffed-up David Heneker’s charming-catchy numbers and brilliantly supplemented them at every turn. 

(Read more)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/theatre/what-to-see/half-a-sixpence-chichester-festival-theatre-review-so-warm-you-f/

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/. If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

 

     


MCLEAN: ‘C.S. LEWIS ONSTAGE: THE MOST RELUCTANT CONVERT’ (SV PICK, CHI)

(Hedy Weiss’s article appeared in the Chicago Sun-Times, 7/25.)

The British intellectual C.S. Lewis (1898-1963) was a man of many pursuits. A novelist, poet, literary critic, essayist, broadcaster, lecturer, academic (who spent much of his life at Oxford and Cambridge) and medievalist (who shared his interest in this period with his friend J.R.R. Tolkien), he is perhaps best known as the author of “The Screwtape Letters” (a satirical tale in which all the temptations and failings of a human life are examined from the viewpoint of devils) and “The Chronicles of Narnia” (a series of seven fantasy novels that stand as a classic of children’s literature).

In 2008, actor-adapter-director Max McLean brought his production of C.S. Lewis’ “The Screwtape Letters” to the Mercury Theater Chicago, where it became a huge (and surprising) box office hit. Now, in his new one-man show, “C.S. Lewis Onstage: The Most Reluctant Convert,” McLean chronicles the writer’s journey from determined atheist to Christian believer with such wit, grace, braininess and economy that those on either side of the “God spectrum” are sure to delight in it.

(Read more)

http://chicago.suntimes.com/entertainment/witty-map-of-the-road-to-belief-in-one-man-show-about-c-s-lewis/

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/. If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     

A ONE-MAN SHOW ABOUT JACK LEMMON, PERFORMED BY HIS SON

 
 

(Karin Lipson’s article appeared in The New York Times, 7/22; via Pam Green.)

When Jack Lemmon, the Oscar-winning actor, died of cancer at age 76 in 2001, his son, Chris, began writing down memories of the complex man he called Pop. This “search for catharsis,” as he describes it, coalesced in a 2006 memoir, “A Twist of Lemmon: A Tribute to My Father,” and eventually, a one-man stage performance that developed over the course of a decade.

Following a London run, Mr. Lemmon is now bringing the newest reworking of the show, “Twist of Lemmon,” to the Cinema Arts Center in Huntington on July 28.

The show includes photo stills, film clips and Mr. Lemmon, 62, often at a piano. An accomplished pianist and composer, he performs works that “grow directly out of the narrative,” he said in a phone interview from Connecticut, where he lives.

(Read more)

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/24/nyregion/a-one-man-show-about-jack-lemmon-performed-by-his-son.html

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/. If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     

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