STACEY GREGG’S PLAY 'SCORCH' WINS A FRINGE FIRST IN EDINBURGH and more...


STACEY GREGG’S PLAY 'SCORCH' WINS A FRINGE FIRST IN EDINBURGH

 
 

 
 

(Peter Crawley’s article appeared in the Irish Times, 8/26.)

Stacey Gregg’s play Scorch, produced by Belfast’s Prime Cut Productions, has won a coveted Fringe First Award in the final round of awards for the Edinburgh Fringe Festival.

Judged by the reviewers of the Scotsman, the most influential newspaper in Edinburgh during the festival season in August, the Fringe Firsts are awarded specifically for new writing.

(Read more)

http://www.irishtimes.com/culture/stage/stacey-gregg-s-play-scorch-wins-a-fringe-first-in-edinburgh-1.2769781

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/. If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     


‘THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)’: WATCH NOW

(via Pam Green)

 
 

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/. If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     


ROBOT-THEMED STAGE SHOW DRAWS DIVERSE CROWD IN KYOTO, JAPAN

 
 
 

 
 

(Koya Segi’s article appeared in the Japan Times, 8/19.)

OSAKA – A robot-themed theater production in Kyoto has attracted packed houses since opening in 2012.

“Gear,” a 75-minute nonspeaking performance that combines music, projected images and human movement, tells the story of humanoid “Roboroids” who continue to make dolls at the assembly line of an abandoned toy factory.

Since the acting parts are nonverbal, the show is popular among people who don’t understand Japanese and people with hearing impairments, with many coming in groups, according to producer Keito Kohara.

The show has been performed some 1,300 times since its opening.

The cast for the twice-a-day performances that take place most days of the week includes mimes, break dancers, magicians and jugglers.

(Read more)

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/culture/2016/08/19/stage/robot-themed-stage-show-draws-diverse-crowd-kyoto/#.V8Mwe_krJ9M

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/. If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     


AUGUST WILSON: ‘THE PIANO LESSON’ (LISTEN NOW ON BBC RADIO 3—LINK BELOW)

Listen to ‘THE PIANO LESSON’ by August Wilson at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/player/b017lz81#

In August Wilson's Pulitzer Prize-winning play set in Pittsburgh in 1936, an ancient upright piano carved with African faces dominates the parlour of Doaker Charles. Boy Willie and his partner Lymon have come up from the south to sell watermelons. Boy Willie has just got out of prison and he wants to buy the land his ancestors once worked as slaves but his sister is not about to sell the piano.

Creative consultant, Ricardo Khan Pianist, Ernie Scott

"The glow accompanying August Wilson's place in contemporary American theatre is fixed." Toni Morrison.

August Wilson (1945-2005) is America's foremost black playwright. 'The Piano Lesson' is the fourth of his cycle of ten plays about the African American experience in the twentieth century. It opened at the Yale Repertory Theatre in 1987 and the 1990 Broadway production won a Pulitzer Prize, a Drama Desk Award and the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for Best Play. The play was inspired by Romare Bearden's painting of the same name. August Wilson saw its scene of a teacher and student as an allegory for how African Americans must learn to negotiate their history.

This radio production was recorded at Tony Award winning Crossroads Theatre, New Brunswick, New Jersey, with the support of August Wilson's widow, and an outstanding cast which includes actors like Stephen Henderson and Anthony Chisholm who worked extensively with August Wilson. Anthony and Stephen were both in the Olivier award winning production of 'Jitney' which took London by storm ten years ago and Stephen and Chris Chalk were both in the Broadway Tony award winning production of August Wilson's 'Fences' starring Denzel Washington in 2010.

First broadcast in November 2011.

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/. If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     

STEPHEN SACHS: “BAKERSFIELD MIST” (SV PICK, CHI)

 
 

(Hedy Weiss’s article appeared in the Chicago Sun-Times, 8/26.)

If you’ve been following news of the art world in recent months you may have come across two intriguing front page stories. In one, actor Alec Baldwin accused a major New York gallery owner of selling him a canvas by painter Ross Bleckner that was a more recent version of the original painting he had requested. In another (a case that played out in a Chicago courtroom), a man who wanted to sell an early painting by Scottish artist Peter Doig he believed to be worth $10 million, was told it was not a work by Doig at all.

Whether being purchased or sold by an individual or a museum, matters of authenticity and provenance (the trail of ownership attached to a work of art) have long been of crucial importance. Forgeries and copies are as old as the making of art itself, and ownership (marred by everything from wartime looting to ordinary theft), can be dubious. But art is now seen as a major investment – a high-priced commodity – as much as a thing of beauty, wonderment, mystery or delight. And egos are heavily involved in its vetting and acquisition.

(Read more)

http://chicago.suntimes.com/entertainment/in-bakersfield-mist-the-elusive-art-of-judging-art/

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/. If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     

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