MICHAEL FEINGOLD: IN A YEAR OF TURMOIL, THE OBIES REFLECT ON GENDER AND ETHNICITY and more...


MICHAEL FEINGOLD: IN A YEAR OF TURMOIL, THE OBIES REFLECT ON GENDER AND ETHNICITY

 
 

(Feingold's article appeared in the Village Voice, 5/20.)

I'm a white male, old enough to collect Social Security if our Republican Congress doesn't abolish it before next month. And this year, when the judges for the Obie awards had finished their last exhausting meeting, I cast my eye down the splendid list of winners we'd assembled, as the chairman of the committee is supposed to do, and I suddenly felt myself alone. Not deeply, frighteningly alone, mind you. Not wholly alone. And certainly not isolated: Many of the winners were artists I had long admired. Some were personal acquaintances, friends, even colleagues. But of white males, of my generation, there were few to none.

I felt a slight tremor of perturbation at this. Had we been unjustly neglecting some important school of works? In our eagerness to support the principle of diversity, had we leaned too far over, so that our principle became a bias? I ran through the season in my mind: shows I loved, shows I loathed, shows that brought me mixed feelings. A few in that last category sent up flags: a performance we might have honored (by an actor who has already won multiple Obies), a script that maybe should have weighed more heavily with us (by a writer who has amassed plenty of awards). It didn't feel as though we'd made major omissions or glaring oversights. I looked over the list again. It felt right. It just felt...different.

(Read more)

http://www.villagevoice.com/2015-05-20/theater/in-a-year-of-turmoil-the-obies-reflect-on-gender-and-ethnicity/

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LYDIA LEONARD TALKS ABOUT ‘WOLF HALL’

 
 

(Alexis Soloski’s article appeared in The New York Times, 5/6; via Pam Green.)

At the end of every performance of “Wolf Hall,” the actress Lydia Leonard rushes downstairs to get her corset unlaced. “If there’s a knot, it takes 30 seconds longer, and it feels like an eternity,” she said.

But all those petticoats and farthingales have been good to Ms. Leonard, 33. As Anne Boleyn, the tragic heroine of the twinned plays based on the novels of Hilary Mantel, she has just received a Tony nomination for best performance by a featured actress in a play.

Like Boleyn, Ms. Leonard, the daughter of an accountant and a costume historian, spent several formative years in France. After returning to England, she studied at the Bristol Old Vic Theater School and has made a career of shrewd brunettes, including Anne, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, whom she played in the West End, and Virginia Woolf, whom she plays in “Life in Squares,” a mini-series that will air on BBC later this year.

(Read more)

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/10/theater/theaterspecial/lydia-leonard-talks-about-wolf-hall.html

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http 2015:// www.stagevoices.com/ . If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com.

     


‘AS YOU LIKE IT’ AT THE GLOBE (REVIEW PICK, UK)

(Jane Shilling’s article appeared in the Telegraph, 5/21.)

All Shakespeare’s comedies are perplexing, but As You Like It has divided critical opinion more fiercely than most. George Bernard Shaw considered it a potboiler. Tolstoy complained of its immorality and found Touchstone wearisome.

And as theatre historian Michael Dobson remarks in a programme note for this production, the play “gets most of its characters as far as a forest and then gives place to an arbitrary series of conversations and set-piece comic routines”.

Yet within those routines, with their teasing collisions of prose and poetry, Shakespeare’s emotional perspicacity still speaks directly to us of love’s confusions; of friendship, alienation and sheep husbandry.

(Read more)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/theatre/theatre-reviews/11620460/As-You-Like-It-Shakespeares-Globe-review-witty-and-affectionate.html

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http 2015:// www.stagevoices.com/ . If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com.

     


A NEW IMAGE OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE HAS BEEN DISCOVERED, HISTORIAN SAYS

(Conal Urquhart’s article appeared in Time magazine, 5/19.)

Mark Griffiths found the image in the 1598 The Herball or Generall Historie of Plantes written by the playwright's friend John Gerard

A historian claims he has discovered the only surviving image of William Shakespeare that was produced in his lifetime.

Mark Griffiths, who is also a botanist, found the image in a book published in 1598, The Herball or Generall Historie of Plantes by John Gerard. The 1,484-page encyclopaedia of plants has four portraits on its title page, the fourth of which Griffiths believes is Shakespeare.

(Read more)

http://time.com/3883886/william-shakespeare-new-image/

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http 2015:// www.stagevoices.com/ . If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com.

     

‘HAMILTON,’ HENDERSON AND HOUGHTON WIN 2015 OBIE AWARDS (FULL LIST)

 
 

(Gordon Cox’s article appeared in Variety, 5/18.)

Hamilton,” the Off Broadway trophy magnet that will make the move to Broadway this summer, racked up one more award at the 60th annual Obie Awards, earning the honor for best new american theater work.

Stephen McKinley Henderson, the star of this year’s Pulitzer-winning play “Between Riverside and Crazy,” took home one of the six performance awards handed out that evening. James Houghton, the founding artistic director of Off Broadway’s Signature Theater, was the previously announced winner of the sustained achievement award, earning the honor just before he steps down from the post after a tenure of 25 years.

Obie grants of $2,500 each went to Horse Trade Theater Group/The Fire This Time Festival and the arts center JACK. Ars Nova, the Off Broadway producing organization behind successes including “Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812,” snagged a $1,000 check, as did the creators of “Hamilton.”

(Read more)

http://variety.com/2015/legit/news/2015-obie-awards-full-list-1201499595/

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http 2015:// www.stagevoices.com/ . If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com.

     

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