10 PLAYWRIGHTS RELAY-WRITE A NEW PLAY DURING THE DUBLIN THEATRE FESTIVAL and more...


10 PLAYWRIGHTS RELAY-WRITE A NEW PLAY DURING THE DUBLIN THEATRE FESTIVAL

(Peter Crawley’s article appeared in the Irish Times, 10/30.)

Late in September, not long before the Dublin Theatre Festival began, the festival approached The Irish Times to discuss a collaboration. The idea was simple, ambitious and close enough to madness to qualify for inclusion in the programme. Laurence Mackin, the Arts and Ticket editor of The Irish Times, invited 10 playwrights to contribute a scene each towards a short play, passing it on like a baton. The finished result would then receive a rehearsed reading by a professional director and cast at the end of the festival. The entire project would come together in three weeks, with most of the writing done in just two weeks, leaving two days to rehearse. How hard could it be?

Such improbable undertakings require a sense of propulsion, and the fuel reserves of the festival, when several productions are opening daily, can be surprisingly easy to siphon. Other things are counter-intuitive: the busier playwrights are, the more inclined they are to agree to a tall order with a 36-hour deadline (most of the playwrights had recently seen a new work staged), as though creative momentum was better to sustain. But the most crucial aspect was getting the ball rolling. 

(Read more)

http://www.irishtimes.com/culture/stage/the-arc-a-team-of-dramatists-undertake-a-mad-experiment-1.1980911

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/ .  If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     

FLICKERING LIGHTS, STRANGE MUSIC AND A GHOST AT A BROOKLYN BAR. MAYBE.

(Chadwick Moore’s article appeared in The New York Times, 10/27; via Pam Green.)

On a dark morning in September 2006, Miguel Vargas arrived for work at a Brooklyn restaurant called Sweetwater. He unlocked and lifted the security gate, took two steps inside and saw a woman in profile walking across the dining room toward a basement stairwell.

She was middle-aged with gray hair and dressed in white, like a wedding dress, he said, but not one from this century. And she appeared corporeal, “normal,” Mr. Vargas said, not nebulous or translucent like on television.

“I knew it was a ghost when I saw it. I said, ‘O.K., that’s it.’ And I walked away.” For the next half-hour he stood outside, trembling. When Mr. Vargas, a porter at the restaurant, told his bosses, they laughed.

(Read more)

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/28/nyregion/flickering-lights-strange-music-and-a-ghost-at-a-brooklyn-restaurant-maybe.html?_r=0

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/ .  If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     

FORD: ‘TIS PITY SHE'S A WHORE’ (REVIEW PICK, UK)

 

(Michael Billington’s article appeared in the Guardian, 10/20.)

After a spate of concept-driven classic revivals, this production of John Ford’s 1633 incest drama falls like manna from heaven. Even in this intimate, candlelit space you can appreciate that the play has been visibly directed by Michael Longhurst: at the same time, everything is driven by a desire to illuminate Ford’s text rather than exhibit the director’s ego.

Longhurst’s prime achievement is to preserve a balance between the incestuous siblings and the hypocritical society that surrounds them: he neither sentimentalises the lovers nor overdoes the Italianate corruption. He also makes a crucial distinction between the disingenuous Giovanni, who falsely claims the church has sanctioned sex with his sister, and his spirited sibling, Annabella, who simply follows the promptings of her heart. With comparable subtlety, Longhurst shows that not all clerics are cut from the same cloth. A papal nuncio is a murder-sanctioning brute, while there is a genuine moral urgency to the humble friar who conjures up a vision of hell – where “damned souls roar without pity” – that reminds one of Dante’s Inferno.

(Read more)

http://www.theguardian.com/stage/2014/oct/29/tis-pity-shes-a-whore-review-sam-wanamaker-playhouse

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/ .  If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     

TOM STOPPARD BACKS MOSCOW’S TEATR.DOC

(from Russia Beyond the Headlines, 10/27; via Interfax.)

Today the Colta.ru website published a text of the letter that Tom Stoppard wrote to support a Moscow theater

In the letter, Stoppard said he was shocked by that the news that Teatr.doc was being turned out of its building. He went on to say that for the English-speaking world, the Russian theater culture has always been a source of inspiration and an object of adoration, but this culture could not appear out of nothing: "It grows out of new voices, new forms, new ideas, and new subject matter."

"In Russia Teatre.doc is currently the most important example of a theatre group which, quite apart from the quality of its work which has given it an international reputation, contains the seeds of a vibrant and relevant theatre of the future. It fulfills one of the prime functions of art in society, namely to reflect, interpret and offer a critique of the social environment it lives in," Stoppard said.


Source: Russia Beyond the Headlines - http://rbth.com/news/2014/10/27/tom_stoppard_backs_moscows_teatrdoc_40923.html

 

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/ .  If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com

     

KASHMIRI ‘HAMLET’ STIRS RAGE IN INDIA

 

(Vaibhav Vats’s  article appeared in The New York Times, Oct. 27, 2014.)

NEW DELHI — The Bollywood director Vishal Bhardwaj has made his name by adapting Shakespeare into film, using the plays to reflect the violence and vicissitudes of modern India. “Maqbool,” an adaptation of “Macbeth,” was set in the Mumbai underworld; “Omkara” transported “Othello” to the feudal badlands of northern India. His latest effort, a loose adaptation of “Hamlet” called “Haider,” which takes place in Kashmir during the turbulent 1990s, has become the most acclaimed and contentious Bollywood movie of the year.

The film, which opened internationally on Oct. 2, drew a fierce reaction on social media from Hindu nationalists, who called for a boycott. Kashmir, a disputed territory claimed by both India and Pakistan, remains a sensitive subject on the Indian subcontinent.

(Read more)

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/28/movies/haider-angers-hindu-nationalists-but-excites-film-critics.html?hpw&rref=movies&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&module=well-region®ion=bottom-well&WT.nav=bottom-well&_r=0

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/ .  If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     

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