THE ARTIST CHRISTO TALKS ABOUT HIS LATEST PROJECT and more...


THE ARTIST CHRISTO TALKS ABOUT HIS LATEST PROJECT

 
 

 
 

(from Here and Now, 6/27.)

The artist Christo’s latest project, “The Floating Piers,” is a walkway covered in yellow-orange fabric that stretches almost two miles into Lake Iseo in northern Italy, connecting two islands with the mainland. The project is open to the public for just 16 days, from June 18 to July 3, then it will be dismantled and recycled.

It’s Christo’s first large-scale project since he and his late wife and artists partner, Jeanne-Claude, installed “The Gates” in New York’s Central Park in 2005. Their other projects include “Wrapped Coast” in Australia, “Wrapped Reichstag” in Berlin, “Surrounded Islands” in Miami, “Running Fence” in Northern California. Here & Now’Jeremy Hobson talks with Christo about this project, which he and Jeanne-Claude first got the idea for in the late 1960s.

(read more)

http://www.wbur.org/hereandnow/2016/06/27/artist-christo-floating-piers

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/. If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     


‘SHUFFLE ALONG’ DECIDES IT CAN’T GO ON WITHOUT AUDRA MCDONALD

 
 

(Michael Paulson’s article appeared in The New York Times, 2016; via  Pam Green.)

“Shuffle Along,” one of the most ambitious and anticipated musicals of the theater season just ended, will close next month, abruptly and unexpectedly, the show’s producers said Thursday.

The July 24 closing is a surprise because the show, which explores the back story and aftermath of one of the first all-black musicals on Broadway, has been doing well at the box office, grossing nearly $973,686 last week, with a healthy average ticket price of $127. Directed by George C. Wolfe, it was nominated for 10 Tony Awards but won none.

The show, with a full title of “Shuffle Along, or The Making of the Musical Sensation of 1921 and All That Followed,” was apparently facing a sharp drop-off in ticket sales this summer, after its leading actress, Audra McDonald, is scheduled to begin a maternity leave. The musician Rhiannon Giddens had been cast as Ms. McDonald’s replacement and had already begun rehearsals.

(Read more)

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/24/theater/shuffle-along-decides-it-cant-go-on-without-audra-mcdonald.html?_r=0

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/. If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work relate

     


‘THE NEW YORKER, THEATRE LISTINGS, 7/4 PLAYDECK

 
 
OPENINGS AND PREVIEWS

THE GOLDEN BRIDE

Museum of Jewish Heritage

The National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene mounts an encore run of this 1923 operetta, about a young woman raised in a Russian shtetl who journeys to America to find her mother.

Opens July 4.

GET TICKETS

ICE FACTORY 2016

New Ohio

The festival of new work continues with John Kaplan’s “Are We Human,” set in a postapocalyptic future in which a toxic cloud covers the planet, and “The Annotated History of the American Muskrat,” from the company Foxy Henriques, in which eight people are kept awake as part of a mysterious experiment.

Opens June 29.

GET TICKETS

OSLO

Mitzi E. Newhouse

Bartlett Sher directs J. T. Rogers’s play, which recounts how a Norwegian diplomat (Jennifer Ehle) and her husband (Jefferson Mays) orchestrated the secret talks that led to the Oslo Accords, in the nineteen-nineties.

In previews. Opens July 11.

GET TICKETS

PTP/NYC

Atlantic Stage 2

Potomac Theatre Project presents two plays in repertory, both from 1981: Howard Barker’s “No End of Blame: Scenes of Overcoming,” about a Hungarian political cartoonist sparring with government censors, and C. P. Taylor’s “Good,” in which a professor studies a German man succumbing to madness.

In previews. Opens July 12.

GET TICKETS

SMALL MOUTH SOUNDS

Pershing Square Signature Center

A return engagement of Bess Wohl’s comedy, directed by Rachel Chavkin, in which six urbanites attend a silent retreat in upstate New York.

In previews. Opens July 13.

GET TICKETS

(Read more)

http://www.newyorker.com/goings-on-about-town/theatre

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/. If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     


‘HAMILTON’ RAISES BENJAMINS FOR HILLARY

(Dominic Patten’s article appeared in Deadline Hollywood, 6/25; via the Drudge Report.)

Lin-Manuel Miranda won’t be in the house in the title role but Hamilton is once again lending the Democrats a Broadway hand with a July 12 fundraiser for Hillary Clinton.

With the ex-Secretary of State’s campaign having bought out the Richard Rodgers Theatre for the unusual Tuesday matinee, tickets are going from $2,700 to $100,000 a pop (for event co-chairs).

Presumptive nominee Clinton will be in attendance for the fundraiser, which comes two-weeks before the Democrats have their National Convention in Philadelphia.

(Read more)

http://deadline.com/2016/06/hamilton-broadway-fundraiser-hillary-clinton-1201779556/

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/. If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     

JOHN LEGUIZAMO’S WALLS MAY TALK, BUT THEY DON’T CRITICIZE

 
  

(Joann Kaufman’s article appeared in The New York Times, 6/17; via Pam Green.)

What I Love

John Leguizamo has, in his own words, “a great therapist,” and a while back this estimable health care professional offered his intense patient some very solid advice: Get a hobby.

“Acting was my everything,” said Mr. Leguizamo, 51, who is a new addition to the cast of the Netflix series “Bloodline.” (Season two was released late last month.) He also stars with Bryan Cranston in the feature film “The Infiltrator,” to be released July 13. “But I need distractions, because show business is stressful, man. There’s a lot of stress and pressures and criticism.”

Eight years ago, Mr. Leguizamo came up with a surefire distraction: He would sell his brownstone on the Lower East Side and buy another one in the West Village. Then, with the wavering support of his wife, Justine, 47, who he said favors apartments with doormen, he would fix it up. Eventually, this led to an idea for yet another distraction: He would become the faithful caretaker of the 150-year-old (or thereabouts) wisteria with Medusa-like tendrils in the backyard.

(Read more)

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/19/realestate/john-leguizamos-walls-may-talk-but-they-dont-criticize.html?_r=0

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http://www.stagevoices.com/. If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com .

     

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