MEMOIRS: FAYE DUNAWAY, TO DEY STREET BOOKS; JULIE ANDREWS, TO HACHETTE and more...


MEMOIRS: FAYE DUNAWAY, TO DEY STREET BOOKS; JULIE ANDREWS, TO HACHETTE

(from Publishers Lunch 3/31.)

Memoir 
Academy Award winning actress Faye Dunaway's recollections, stories and behind the scenes account of the making of one of Hollywood's most iconic films, Mommie Dearest, to Julia Cheiffetz at Dey Street Books, by Alan Nevins at Renaissance (World). 

Julie Andrews' second memoir covering the 1960's through the early 1990's during which time Andrews began her filmed entertainment career starting with Mary Poppins and The Sound of Music and pivotal career highlights in films like Hawaii, Thoroughly Modern Millie, and Victor/Victoria, in addition to her experiences with motherhood and her marriage to Hollywood writer/director/producer Blake Edwards, to Mauro DiPreta at Hachette Books, by Steve Sauer of Media Four (World). 

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GENE SAKS, REST IN PEACE (1921-2015)

 
 

(Bruce Weber’s article appeared in The New York Times, 3/29; via Pam Green.)

Gene Saks, an actor who switched to stage and film directing in midcareer, winning three Tony Awards and becoming the leading interpreter of the plays of Neil Simon, died on Saturday at his home in East Hampton, N.Y. He was 93.

The cause was pneumonia, his wife, Keren, said.

As a director, Mr. Saks focused on comedy, and he excelled with the kind of snappy, battle-of-the-sexes material that might be termed the theater of repartee. He often said he was concerned that laugh lines be not simply jokes but also expressions of character; nonetheless, he was known for his comic instinct and for helping actors with line readings and timing to make a scene work. That said, he was never a cutup or a wit.

“He could direct actors to be funny, but he wasn’t funny himself,” said Emanuel Azenberg, who produced nine Broadway shows directed by Mr. Saks, including eight written by Mr. Simon. “He would say, ‘This is funny,’ in a very serious way. And you’d laugh, because that was funny. All of those fundamentals — pacing, timing, line readings — that had to do with: If you said it this way it would be funny, but if you said it another way it wouldn’t be funny. That’s what he was good at.”

(Read more)

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/30/theater/gene-saks-actor-and-director-of-stage-and-film-dies-at-93.html?mwrsm=Email&_r=0

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http 2015://www.stagevoices.com/ .  If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com

     

3 RUSSIAN CONTRIBUTIONS TO THEATRE THAT CHANGED THE WORLD

(Alexandra Guryanova’s article appeared in Russia Beyond the Headlines, 3/27.)


The plays of Anton Chekhov

Chekhov's plays were a breakthrough in world drama in the first quarter of the 20th century. Their plots distinguished them from traditional dramas of that time by virtue of their special psychological depth. Chekhov did not show the only true path to the salvation of heroes. Instead, he drew spectators into the study of everyday behavior of the characters and encouraged them to make their own conclusions.

His work, alongside the works of Ibsen, Strindberg and Shaw, formed the basis of "New Drama," an important theatrical trend at the turn of the century. Outstanding playwrights revered Chekhov as the father of psychological theater. For example, Bernard Shaw called his play Heartbreak House a "fantasia in the Russian manner on English themes."

Tennessee Williams adored The Seagull and wanted to put it on stage in his interpretation for the rest of his life. This play, alongside Three Sisters and The Cherry Orchard, has been translated into more than 80 languages and been staged countless times in the UK, Germany, France, Japan, the U.S. and other countries. 

- http://rbth.com/arts/2015/03/27/3_russian_contributions_to_theater_that_changed_the_world_44807.html)

 Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http 2015://www.stagevoices.com/ .  If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com

     

CORY FINLEY: ‘THE FEAST’ (REVIEW PICK, NY)

 
 

(Alexis Soloski’s article appeared in The New York Times, 3/20; via Pam Green.)

Ever had a leaky faucet? Or a clogged drain? Cory Finley’s “The Feast” at the Flea is the sort of play to make you grateful for such mundane plumbing problems. Matt’s wonky W.C. is a whole lot eerier.

Screams and groans emanate from deep within his toilet. “Like a man, tied up down there,” a plumber (Donaldo Prescod) explains. “Water streaming over his mouth. All day. Not quite a human. Almost like a dying whale. Full of sorrow. Like it was whispering the experience of its own slow death into your ear.” Is there a Roto-Rooter in the house? (That the Flea’s downstairs space adjoins its musty lavatories makes the production practically site-specific.)

(Read more)

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/21/theater/review-the-feast-plumbs-the-depths-of-a-troubling-toilet.html

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http 2015://www.stagevoices.com/ .  If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com

     

LOOK BACK IN ANGER: HOW JOHN OSBORNE LIBERATED THEATRICAL LANGUAGE

 

(Michael Billington's article appeared in the Guardian, 3/30.) 

In the summer of 1955 an advertisement appeared in the Stage newspaper asking for new plays. It had been placed by the English Stage Company, which was setting up in business at an unfashionable theatre, the Royal Court, in London’s Sloane Square. The response to the ad was tremendous. Seven hundred and fifty scripts poured in.

The only trouble was, most of them were rubbish: either bottom-drawer pieces by hack writers or, in the words of Tony Richardson, who was to become the ESC’s associate director, “endless blank-verse shit”.

(Read more)

http://www.theguardian.com/stage/2015/mar/30/how-look-back-in-anger-john-osborne

Visit Stage Voices Publishing for archived posts and sign up for free e-mail updates: http 2015://www.stagevoices.com/ .  If you would like to contribute a review, monologue, or other work related to theatre, please write to Bob Shuman at Bobjshuman@gmail.com

     

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