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"Kevin Kruse Blog" - 5 new articles

  1. ERGs, Friendship, and Employee Engagement
  2. A System for Running Great Meetings
  3. How to Receive Feedback and Criticism
  4. Top 10 Employee Engagement Books
  5. 3 Lessons in Leadership From Sting (yes, Sting)
  6. More Recent Articles
  7. Search Kevin Kruse Blog
  8. Prior Mailing Archive

ERGs, Friendship, and Employee Engagement

How important is it to have friends at work?

As adults, in any given week we spend much more time around people at work than we do outside of the organization. As social creatures, it is inevitable that we form personal relationships and friendships with those around us.

In fact, one of the questions from Gallup’s famous Q12 survey is, “I have a best friend at work.” By their own admission this is one of the more controversial questions on the survey. In my own companies I know we struggled with how to interpret this question. Are they asking if my best friend in the world just so happens to work with me? Do they mean there is someone at work I like better than others?

Despite the confusion around the question, the data is clear that friendship is more important than pay or benefits, and strongly correlates to productivity, safety, customer loyalty and profitability (source: The Collective Advantage, Gallup).

So how can leaders foster friendships in the workplace, for the benefit of the organization as a whole?

Click here to read full column on Forbes.

What motivates you at work? Take the Engagement Style Quiz to find out.

Check out Employee Engagement 2.0, by Kevin Kruse, and discover how leaders turn apathetic groups into emotionally committed teams.

  
    

A System for Running Great Meetings

How can you run a great meeting that is engaging for participants, productive, and a great investment of everyone’s time?

I still have a painful memory of the first time I organized an off-site meeting with all the employees in my small but growing company. I was so excited to share with them our performance metrics, the exciting ideas I had, and how we would conquer the world. By one o’clock in the afternoon everyone was zoning out and one person was literally asleep. How could they not care? How could they not be as fascinated and engaged as I was?

Dick and Emily Axelrod, in their new book Let’s Stop Meeting Like This: Tools to Save Time and Get More Done, share a system for running great meetings. They summarize it with a metaphor of a canoe with six parts:

Click here to read full column on Forbes

What motivates you at work? Take the Engagement Style Quiz to find out.

Check out Employee Engagement 2.0, by Kevin Kruse, and discover how leaders turn apathetic groups into emotionally committed teams.

 

  
    

How to Receive Feedback and Criticism

How can you take the sting out of feedback, and use it grow and get closer to achieving your full potential?

We all say we want feedback, but we don’t really. What we truly want is to be liked, to be loved, to fit in, to have our boss think we’re awesome. And criticism, by definition, is letting us know that we still have some work to do. It puts a ding in our self-worth and ego.

Click here to read full column on Forbes to learn 4 things to do when receiving feedback or criticism.

What motivates you at work? Take the Engagement Style Quiz to find out.

Check out Employee Engagement 2.0, by Kevin Kruse, and discover how leaders turn apathetic groups into emotionally committed teams.

 

  
    

Top 10 Employee Engagement Books

I’m often asked to recommend employee engagement books. I’m obviously proud of my own books in the field, but thought it would be interesting to see what the best selling employee engagement books were according to Amazon. They are:

1) Employee Engagement 2.0: Hot to Motivate Your Team for High Performance, by Kevin Kruse

2) Carrots and Sticks Don’t Work: build a Culture of Employee Engagement with the Principles of RESPECT, by Paul Marciano

3) Employee Engagement for Everyone: 4 Keys to Happiness and Fulfillment at Work, by Kevin Kruse

4) Employee Engagement: Tools for Analysis, Practice, and Competitive Advantage, by William Macey et al

5) Intrinsic Motivation at Work, by Kenneth Thomas

6) Employee Engagement Lessons From the Mouse House, by Pete Blank

7) The Art of Engagement: Bridging the Gap Between People and Possibilities, by Jim Haudan

8) Employee Engagement for Dummies, by Bob Kelleher

9) Louder Than Words: Ten Practical Employee Engagement Steps That Drive Results, by Bob Kelleher

10) Manager’s Guide to Employee Engagement, Scott Carbonara

Enjoy!

(Methodology: List was based on results for a search on “employee engagement” and adding Amazon sales rank numbers for both Print and Kindle versions of each book, as of August 4, 2014. Books that did not have both Kindle and print-based versions were omitted from results.)

  
    

3 Lessons in Leadership From Sting (yes, Sting)

The following is a guest post from Meridith Elliott Powell. Meredith is is the author of Winning in the Trust and Value Economy (Global Professional Publishing, 2013) and is the founder and owner of MotionFirst.

Well like it or not, British musician’s Sting’s children are going to have to work for living. In an interview with the Mail Online  the former front man for the 80’s band The Police, revealed that he has no plans to leave his children much if any of his $306 million fortune, fearing trust funds would be an “albatrosses around their neck.”

A rags to riches story himself, Sting, who is the third richest musician in Britain, came  from a poor working class family in Northeast England. In the interview, Sting explained he wanted his children to have the same opportunity to earn their way and have that feeling of accomplishment and success that can only come from doing it yourself. He revealed that he has often discussed his plan with his children, and he feels because of that his children have never really expected much financial support from him, and he respects and appreciates that. He went on to share that his goals has been for his children to grow up with a ethic, and a passion to succeed on their own merit.

So why should we care about or listen to how Sting is raising his children, or what he plans to do with his fortune? Because, while it is interesting that a father, worth more than $300 million, has no plans to leave a dime to his children; more importantly, we should listen because of the strong leadership lesson – a powerful message of how to develop people, and a true lesson of leadership.

In the interview, Sting admitted what he wants for his children was what he had, yes certainly a chance to earn a lot of money and become wealthy beyond his wildest dreams; but more importantly, the feeling of accomplishment and success you get only from actually doing it yourself.

3 Results From A Lesson With Sting:

  1. Drive – drive is the push we have to want to succeed, to get back up when we fail, and to commit to the hard work it takes to achieve success. Sting has planted the seeds of drive with his children with the perfect balance of support and belief and “no net” or no guarantee. If you want to build leadership, and create that next level of talent, you have to let your emerging leaders know you believe in them, and be there to provide advice and praise. At the same time, you have to give them the room to fail; allowing them to cut their own path, and develop their own ideas and solutions.
  2. Passion – so often with younger leaders we forget our story and our struggle, and how the power of sharing that will help them on their journey. Sting may not have been generous with his money, but he has been generous with his openness of his story and his struggle. Sharing with his children where he came from, how hard it was, and the mistakes he has made along the way. Most importantly, the courage he had to follow his passion of music, when so many, including his father, told him he was delusional. The power of personal stories in our organizations is vital when developing young leaders; senior leaders sharing and remembering their stories can make them more compassionate and understanding; and for young leaders these stories are a source of inspiration, great learning and motivation.
  3. Confidence – probably the greatest gift of all that Sting is giving his children is confidence. When he shared with them they would have to make their own way, he gave up the right to tell them how to do it, and with that step he laid the groundwork for them to build confidence. Research study after research study reveals that personal confidence is a critical component of success. It is not something, someone else can give you; it is earned through a series of personal wins and overcoming challenges.   If you want to build leaders who have the skills to make decisions, the guts to take a risk and the ability to get results, then you have to give them the room to build their confidence. You can certainly guide them in their decision making and career choices, but at that the end of the day allowing them to take responsibility for their successes and failures will be more powerful than any wisdom you can share.

Yes, it remains to be seen just how successful Sting’s children will be, but that really doesn’t matter. His job, as a father is to provide his children with emotional support and the tools they need to achieve what they want, but how far they go, and what they do is up to them. As leaders trying to develop talent, that is probably our greatest lesson we can take from Sting; it is not our job to guarantee success for anyone, but rather to guarantee a corporate culture where success can be achieved!

Check out Kevin Kruse’s new book, Employee Engagement 2.0, and discover how leaders turn apathetic groups into emotionally committed teams.

Kevin Kruse is a New York Times bestselling author and serial entrepreneur. For insider tips and exclusive content, join his newsletter at kevinkruse.com.

  
    

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