Six Simple Ways to Measure Owned, Earned and Paid Social Media ROI plus 5 more



Six Simple Ways to Measure Owned, Earned and Paid Social Media ROI

There’s a popular misconception that it’s difficult to use targeted metrics to measure your social media ROI. Not true.

Nor is social media only good for measuring an increase in brand awareness, although that’s definitely a measurement gauge.

The fact is, social media can offer some of the best metrics for measuring your ROI. All you need to do is set your success guides—what you want to achieve and how long you want to spend achieving it—then measure your results against that.

Here are six simple metrics for the main networks  to measure your social media ROI – financial and brand – across earned, owned and paid media.

Blogger Outreach

A key component of many (if not most) social media campaigns, blogger outreach programs can offer some of the best mileage and results of any marketing tactic. Measuring your success isn’t too difficult, either. All you have to do is determine the answers to the following questions:

  • How many bloggers wrote about you?
  • How many comments did these posts receive?
  • How many social shares did the post get?
  • What was your traffic pre- and post-outreach?
  • How much product did you have to provide for bloggers versus how many sales you received?

Twitter

One of the stalwarts for any product launch, service or business, Twitter not only offers instant eyeballs but great returns as well. Again, measuring your impact is relatively simple:

  • What was your retweet value (cost of manpower/resources versus follower who takes action)?
  • How often was your hashtag used?
  • How many times was your vanity URL used?
  • How many new (genuine) followers did you get while your promotion was on?
  • If you used something like Sponsored Tweets, what was the cost versus the click-through and conversion?

Facebook

Although it has its critics (including me), Facebook offers some great built-in tools as well as demographic options to help gauge a campaign:

  • How many new worthwhile fans did you make versus how many you targeted?
  • How many times was your promotion message liked/acted on?
  • If you built a Facebook application, how many times was it installed or shared?
  • Were you successful in reaching your target demographic? (Facebook Insights can help you here)?
  • How much did you spend on a Facebook ad, and how did click-throughs and new sales/customers compare?

Google+

While brand pages are still being judged on their effectiveness on Google+, and in-line Google Ads are complementing Google+ content, there are ways to measure your current activity there:

  • Has your profile on search, and resulting traffic to your site, been raised because of your use of Google+?
  • How many Circles have you been added to?
  • How many Plus Ones are your comments and discussions receiving?
  • How active is your community?
  • How many Ripples are your discussions creating?
  • How many attendees are taking part in your Hangouts?

YouTube and Other Video Sites

More than just a fun place to see kids hurt themselves on bikes, YouTube is a key tool in any marketing campaign now—just ask the companies that used it to such effect during this year’s Super Bowl.

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Here are the questions you should be asking:

  • How many views did you get?
  • How many Likes/Upvotes and Favorites did you receive?
  • How many downloads did you get (on video sites that allow downloads)?
  • How many embeds has your video seen elsewhere on the Web?
  • How many subscribers did your channel attract?
  • If your video had a call to action with a vanity URL, how many times did people click through?
  • How many social shares did you get across networks your target demographic use?

Mobile

As marketing evolves, the different ways to reach an audience combine to create new outlets. Mobile marketing is the perfect complement to social marketing, and measurement can easily be achieved:

  • Did you use a push SMS system to drive traffic to a mobile-friendly site? If so, how many views did that account for?
  • Did you use QR codes, and if so, how many times were they used?
  • How many downloads did your mobile app receive?
  • How many check-ins were used on Gowalla and Foursquare?
  • What was the most popular operating system? (This can tell you a lot about your audience’s demographic and buying options.)

These six metrics offer just some of the immediate ways you can measure how successfully your social media goals were met. There are more still, including monitoring tools and more defined analytics. Which ones you use will  depend on the goals you’ve set and how you define success.

No matter how you collect the information you need, it all comes down to comparing man hours and financial outlay to your return to see how successful you were.

It’s important to remember that a lot of marketing can come down to luck and circumstance as much as brilliant strategy—timing and a welcoming audience are key.

But the one thing you can control is measurement, and with social media and mobile marketing, measuring the metrics has never been easier.

So what’s the excuse?

Six Simple Ways to Measure Owned, Earned and Paid Social Media ROI originally appeared on Danny Brown - Award-Winning Social Media Marketing and Influence Marketing Blog - all rights reserved.


The Problem With Making Grandiose Statements

There’s a popular method of content creation, centred around making grandiose statements.

These statements, and the blog posts around them, can range from the usual war cries of being more human in business, to posts on transparency and authenticity on the web, to how an “industry” – for want of a better term – like social media needs its proponents to apologize for all their wrong-doing.

While the messaging of these types of posts may mean well, they only truly mean well if they come with no baggage.

The problem is, many don’t. Instead, they’re temporary soundbites, catharsis, or premises of something the author(s) miss in the bigger picture, that purport to be or do something that rarely continues after the original piece of content has been forgotten.

Words – or whatever shape the content takes, be it a podcast or video instead – are easy to create. And they may even sound good while creating them, and look great when the positive comments and affirmation starts rolling in.

But the real meat is in how the creators are making these things happen continuously, or whether they’ve been – and continue to be – part of the malaise they reside over, and their own previous behaviour and actions lives up to these grandiose statements.

Hindsight is easy; current thinking based on hindsight, just as easy. Grandiose is the easiest of all, because it validates hindsight with a moment of clarity.

Except it doesn’t.

Consistent action validates and clarifies. Grandiose is merely its noisy neighbour.

image: Alex Eylar

The Problem With Making Grandiose Statements originally appeared on Danny Brown - Award-Winning Social Media Marketing and Influence Marketing Blog - all rights reserved.


The Sunday Share: The Future of PR Isn’t Tomorrow, It’s Now

As a business resource, Slideshare stands pretty much head and shoulders above most other content platforms.

From presentations to educational content and more, you can find information and curated media on pretty much any topic you have an interest in.

As a research solution, Slideshare offers analysis from some of the smartest minds on the web across all verticals.

These include standard presentations, videos, multimedia and more.

Which brings us to this week’s Sunday Share.

Every week, I’ll be sharing a presentation that catches my eye and where I feel you might be interested in the information inside. These will range from business to content to social media to marketing and more.

This week, a little bit of cheating as I share the accompanying presentation for my keynote at the recent You Too Social Media Conference at Kent State University, Ohio.

Sponsored by the Akon Area Public Relations Society of America and the Kent State PRSSA Chapter (student), the event hosted PR professionals, alumnis and students from across the state. This presentation looks at where I see the future of PR, and how it merges with its brethren marketing and advertising.

Enjoy.

The Sunday Share: The Future of PR Isn’t Tomorrow, It’s Now originally appeared on Danny Brown - Award-Winning Social Media Marketing and Influence Marketing Blog - all rights reserved.


Remember When We Just Hit Publish?

Remember the good old days of blogging? Come up with something to say, write it down, hit Publish, and onto the next piece whenever that came to mind.

Now we have to worry about content authority, author rank, Hummingbird, content overkill, content optimization, etc, etc.

It seems we spend so much time worrying on the presentation, we lose track of the real reason we blog - love.

Love for the content; love for the experience; love for the audience; love for the reason to publish.

Sometimes we need to say “Screw you, content rules”, and Just. Hit. Publish.

Remember When We Just Hit Publish? originally appeared on Danny Brown - Award-Winning Social Media Marketing and Influence Marketing Blog - all rights reserved.


The Sunday Share: A Game of Social Thrones

As a business resource, Slideshare stands pretty much head and shoulders above most other content platforms.

From presentations to educational content and more, you can find information and curated media on pretty much any topic you have an interest in.

As a research solution, Slideshare offers analysis from some of the smartest minds on the web across all verticals.

These include standard presentations, videos, multimedia and more.

Which brings us to this week’s Sunday Share.

Every week, I’ll be sharing a presentation that catches my eye and where I feel you might be interested in the information inside. These will range from business to content to social media to marketing and more.

This week, a short but fun Game of Thrones-inspired presentation from social dashboard company Hootsuite.

When social media first began to attract the mainstream, networks played nicely with each other. As the battle for users took hold, though, that civility was replaced by siege mentality. This special Game of Social Thrones presentation shows how the social media winter is upon us.

Enjoy.

Note: To view this presentation, scroll your mouse down as opposed to clicking the direction arrows.

image: Rogerio Souza

The Sunday Share: A Game of Social Thrones originally appeared on Danny Brown - Award-Winning Social Media Marketing and Influence Marketing Blog - all rights reserved.



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