Week in Review: Posts and LIFT Shares, Mar. 22 – 28, 2015 and more...




Week in Review: Posts and LIFT Shares, Mar. 22 – 28, 2015

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Week in Review March 22 - 28, 2015: Posts and Podcasts from ConverStations and SmallBiz Tracks (Almost) Daily Podcasts, and LIFT resources shared on Twitter (@mikesansone):

This Week on ConverStations

LIFT Resources Shared on Twitter This Week

LEARN

IMPROVE

FIND FLOW

THINK

You can catch a complete week in review, in addition to top links to give your small business a L.I.F.T by subscribing to Whistle Stops Weekly email newsletter.  Also stay streamed in with the Mike Sansone Social Stream

Week in Review: Posts and LIFT Shares, Mar. 22 – 28, 2015 is a post from: ConverStations


Visuals and Ideas in LIFT Slides 03/28/15

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We are always looking for ways to give small business owners a boost using the LIFT acronym. Here are a few slideshows that might help you in building a better business presence and a smoother work flow:

LEARN - How to Pack a Punch with Social Media

IMPROVE -10 Startup Business Puzzles Visualized and Explained

FIND FLOW –  How to Improve Your Productivity By Working on Self-Control

THINK - From Idea to Business

As a youth, Saturdays were filled with visual candy of cartoons in the morning and movie matinees in the afternoon. Now, we practice sharing Saturday videos from TED, subscriptions from YouTube, LIFT clips, and other videos shared via feeds.

Note: Every Sunday afternoon, our Whistle Stops Weekly newsletter is sent with at least one resource or link to L.I.F.T. your presence or practice. Subscribe today.

Visuals and Ideas in LIFT Slides 03/28/15 is a post from: ConverStations


Storytelling in LIFT Clips 03/28/15

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We are always looking for ways to give small business owners a boost using the LIFT acronym. Here are a few videos that might help you in building a better business presence and a smoother work flow.

The power of story and storytelling is becoming more and more important in building a better presence for your business. Here are a few looks at storytelling and how to do it better, if not different.

LEARN – How to Create a Storyboard

 

IMPROVE – Using Kinetic Typography

 

FIND FLOW – Using a Different Canvas

 

THINK – Why Storytelling Matters

 

As a youth, Saturdays were filled with visual candy of cartoons in the morning and movie matinees in the afternoon. Now, we practice sharing Saturday videos from TED, subscriptions from YouTube, LIFT clips, and other videos shared via feeds.

Note: Every Sunday afternoon, our Whistle Stops Weekly newsletter is sent with at least one resource or link to L.I.F.T. your presence or practice. Subscribe today.

Storytelling in LIFT Clips 03/28/15 is a post from: ConverStations


A Simplified Guide for Naming Business Products

Naming a New Product

Written by Susan Finch

Entrepreneur reported a professional naming firm charges up to $80,000 to develop a name. That figure also often includes working with a professional linguist, graphic design services such as a logo and other collateral. It’s also possible to get a basic service for $50. Whether you hire a professional or pick a name on your own, there is a science behind it.

Here’s what to consider before you register that name:

Come Up with Creative Direction

Conceptualize different buckets or creative directions when you’re naming products. Put each name into a different bucket that correlates to each, like entertainment or presence. Each bucket will represent a different concept and feeling that can help narrow down your choices. Create buckets that both represent a sound and feeling you like, as well as the benefits and features your product offers.

Think Arbitrary

Picking a specific name that says exactly what the product is can make good marketing sense. But it can also pigeonhole you into one product or service. National Public Radio changed their name to NPR so they could expand past their radio medium into other outlets. And consider Apple Inc. The name is easy to remember and completely flexible. Apple Inc. could expand into virtually anything and still have a name that can grow.

What’s in a Name?

Consider existing naming models already out there like Microsoft Office’s home and personal versions. They’re offered for a limited amount of personal computers, tablets and phones. Meanwhile, Microsoft’s professional version offers more robust features at a higher price tag for to help with presentations and communication with professionals in mind. Mozy Enterprise also expands upon free, personal products with remote office protection in the cloud and military-grade encryption.

Consider Public Perception

Harvard Business Review reported that when a company changes the brand name, customers expect to see radically new features. They also discovered customers see the product as more likely to fail or have ability issues with the company’s previous or already existing products. Simply changing a brand name or introducing a new product with an existing customer base could prove tricky. While you don’t need to go back to the drawing board to design all new features, you do need to consider how your current and potential customers will view your offer.

Make Sure It Translates

Choosing a fun sounding brand might work great in your demographic, but the new name could mean something else in another country. If you’re planning to expand overseas, do your homework and ensure your brand translates appropriately. Or pick a name like Flickr, which sounds a bit like a camera flicker but doesn’t really spell anything.

Remember the Legal Implications

Search for existing trademarks though the USPTO. Simply doing an online search to see what your competition is up to can also help you eliminate oversaturated names and stick to original options. Not every business or product is concerned about trademarks, naming rights and domain registration. If you’re a small company who sells information products to your blog audience, you can probably get away with finding a perfect name and registering the domain yourself. But larger companies need to consider searching for existing trademarks.

Author Bio: Susan Finch is a freelance writer with a passion for travel and helping small businesses find their online voice through content marketing, blogging and beyond. She is an eclectic writer with more than 10 years of experience contributing to guidebooks, magazines, iPhone apps, online publications and more. She can be found at BySusanFinch.com.

Note: Occasionally, this site will publish a post by a guest author if the content, links, and purpose is to assist small businesses in building a better presence online or offline. If you are interested in participating with your own guest post, here are the ConverStations Guest Post Guidelines.

A Simplified Guide for Naming Business Products is a post from: ConverStations


Six Steps to a Safer Workplace

safety-sign

Written by Tatiana Castano

A safe workplace can lead to fewer injuries, but it can also make a big difference in a company’s profit margin. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration estimates that employers pay nearly $1 billion a week just to cover direct workers compensation expenses.

Here are six ways to boost workplace safety:

Establish Clear Safety Rules

Safety guidelines will vary depending the company.

Rules for a roofing company would likely include requirements that employees use safety equipment like full body harnesses to avoid fall-related injuries, which OSHA reported as the chief cause of construction industry deaths.

Falls are also the most common reported cause of injuries in office settings, according to the United States Department of Commerce, and mostly result from using boxes or chairs to reach high places instead of ladders. Rules barring this type of activity, as well as encouraging clear walking spaces between furniture, can help reduce the fall risk for office workers.

Establish industry-specific rules and inform employees about them, as well as potential consequences for violations. Employees should also know who their managers are so they may speak with them about any safety concerns.

Encourage Breaks

A CareerBuilder survey indicated 18 percent of employees remain at their work stations for their whole shift.

Research from the University of Illinois shows passing on breaks leads to reduced productivity and lack of focus. Workers who allow themselves breaks during the day have better attention spans and are better equipped to solve problems.

Stress Importance of Reporting

If managers are not aware of a problem they cannot correct it.

Employees must recognize it is imperative to make supervisors aware of any unsafe situations as soon as possible.

OSHA suggests implementing programs that make reporting hazards a positive way for workers to stand out, like creating safety teams, or using leader boards to count and compare hazard reports from employees.

Explain the Fire Plan

OSHA and the Bureau of Labor Statistic reported that 143 workers perished in workplace fires in 2011.

Workers should know how to use fire extinguishers and where they are located throughout the workplace. Go over the company fire plan in detail; make sure workers know how to find all building exits and where to meet up with coworkers once they have escaped the building.

Offer First Aid Education

Show employees where first aid kits, eye wash stations and emergency showers are located.

According to OSHA, the first 10 to 15 seconds after a worker is exposed to a corrosive substance are critical for avoiding more serious eye or skin injuries, so getting the injured worker to a wash station fast is key.

Some companies may benefit from 24-hour on-call nurse triage services, which offer immediate medical advice over the phone to workers who suffer injuries.

Conduct Substance Use Screenings

The National Drug-Free Workplace Alliance estimates that workers who use drugs are three times more likely to be in a workplace accident, and 40 percent of industrial deaths are alcohol-related.

Drug test potential new employees to avoid hiring people with substance abuse issues, and conduct random drug screenings to promote continued sobriety. Employees involved in workplace accidents should undergo drug and alcohol tests. Doing so protects the company and demonstrates its commitment to employee safety.

Bottom Line

A safer workplace leads to happier, more productive employees, and a more profitable business. By following these steps, you and your employees can enjoy exactly that!

Author Bio: Tatiana Castano develops and executes national training programs that enable USAMDT franchisees working with employers to keep drugs and alcohol out of the workplace as USA Mobile Drug Testing‘s Director of Training and Compliance. You can connect with her on LinkedIn or Facebook.

Note: Occasionally, this site will publish a post by a guest author if the content, links, and purpose is to assist small businesses in building a better presence online or offline. If you are interested in participating with your own guest post, here are the ConverStations Guest Post Guidelines.

Photo on Pixabay by Skitterphoto

Six Steps to a Safer Workplace is a post from: ConverStations