Kauai's Hindu Monastery

July 2015

[Click to see the full newsletter on the web]

bd.jpgMessage from Satguru

In early June, Sannyasin Shanmuganathaswami, Natyam Mayuranatha and I attended the Hindu Temple of Greater Chicago's (Lemont) weekend festival to Siva and Sakti. Saturday was the homa with Maha Rudram chanting, and Sunday the Chandi homa. Over 4,000 devotees were in attendance. At the opening event on Friday—a Ganapati and navagraha homa and abhishekam—the temple invited me to give a short talk. My topic mentioned how Gurudeva helped start the Lemont temple with the gift of a Ganesha murti and encouragement that the devotees hold a puja every week in one of the homes. I shared that Gurudeva guided some thirty-seven temples in this way and did so because of his strong conviction that it is the temple that perpetuates Hindu culture. He strongly felt that if Hindus move to a country and do not build a temple, after a few generations their ancestral culture will have been lost: "As long as religion and worship and the practice of pilgrimage and all the refinements of our great religion are present, culture will be there." General contributions for June totaled $33,412, which is significantly less than our minimum monthly goal of $65,000. Special project contributions totaled an additional $175. We are grateful to our global family of temple builders for your continued and generous support. Aum Namasivaya!

Click here to see Satguru's extended travel schedule. Bookmark the link and return for updates.



Recent Happenings

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Paramacharya Sivanathaswami places holy ash to welcome the granite murti of Gurudeva moments after it was installed on the Path of the Saiva Saints


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Behrang Ulu Ganesha Temple: This metal image of Ganesa was placed over one of the blessed kumbas that Satguru Bodhinatha carried up to the temple roof, then poured the holy waters over the central spire of the Behrang Ulu Ganesha Temple



ann1.jpgann2.jpgrecent1.jpgrecent2.JPGTop to bottom: Satguru pours blessed water atop the spire of the central sanctum of the Behrang Ulu Ganesha Temple in Malaysia at the height of the Maha Kumbhabhishekam; 121 priests perform Navachandi Yagna at the Hindu Temple of Greater Chicago in Lemont, Illinois; devotees gather for a group photo at the airport during Satguru's visit to Singapore; a few of the giant boulders being placed near Iraivan Temple as part of a new landscape plan. Plants are next.

Iraivan Temple Progress
While the carving work of the temple's perimeter wall continues in Bengaluru, India, on Kauai the monks are focusing on the temple landscaping project. In June we began the enormous task of moving some of the huge boulders (some over 20,000 pounds) delivered from Kauai's Westside quarry. One by one the team is setting them in place. This part of the project will be done in segments over the next year. While the heavy equipment was here, the eight black granite statues of the satgurus of our lineage were moved to their permanent places along the Path of the Saiva Satgurus. This 1,350-foot path winds around the monastery's lotus and water lily ponds located north of Iraivan Temple. Now when one walks the path around the ponds, he or she is greeted by the great sages of our lineage, each in a unique and sacred spot, near waterfalls and bubbling brooks. Four of the statues were placed on their specially carved granite bases. Early next year the remaining four bases will arrive from India and, after some 13 years, this part of the temple project will be completed.

Satguru Bodhinatha Veylanswami's Activities
On June 4 Satguru Bodhinatha Veylanswami and Nirvani Tejadevanatha flew off for a few days to Singapore and Malaysia where Satguru had been invited to preside over the Kumbhabhishekam at the Sri Siddhi Vinayagar Temple in Behrang Ulu about 90 km north of the Kuala Lumpur city center. He gave a talk, translated into Tamil, to the crowd gathered for the event and later poured the sanctified water over the vimanam tower. Later Satguru gave vibhuti blessings for two hours...[more]



Bodhinatha's Newest Teachings Online
Satguru Bodhinatha is now turning his 15-minute Keynote presentations into movies which can be used for our personal benefit or shared at a satsang of friends. See them here. Thanks to a vibrant team of transcribers we can hear Bodhinatha's recent talks and read the transcriptions here. Read the transcriptions on line. Click here for all of Bodhinatha's talks.

Bodhinatha's weekly talks can be heard on our website:

Click here for a complete index of both Bodhinatha's and Gurudeva's talks on line

Recent Talks:
Purify Subconscious, Let Go of Negative Attachments (May 6, 2015)
Uphold Behavior Twenty-Four Hours a Day (April 19, 2015)
Bliss, Satchidananda and Samadhi (April 13, 2015)
Activating Kundalini; Patanjali's Kriya Yoga (March 28, 2015)

Click here to see Bodhinatha's extended travel schedule. Bookmark the link and return for updates.

Follow our daily activities at Today at Kauai's Hindu Monastery (blog)


Iraivan Temple's Clay Ganesha Fundraiser

September 16th is the date for Ganesha Chaturthi (in the USA) this year. For the tenth year in a row eco-friendly clay Ganeshas have been made as a seva by a temple devotee and are being offered as a fundraiser for Iraivan Temple. They are completely biodegradable for Visarjana worship and immersion. Sold, for $5 and $10, individually or in batches of 24 and shipped to you by USPS. Perfect for the temple Bal Vihar or a pre-Ganesh Chaturthi backyard picnic painting party. See ganeshaforvisarjana.com for more information.


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The Eight Limbs of Yoga Carved in Iraivan's Stone


With the grand success of International Yoga Day on June 21, we thought it a good time to feature Iraivan's depiction of the ancient mystical art carved into several pillars along the temple's east side. They serve as a 1,000-year teaching that yoga is not simply for health benefits, but is a regal means to enlightenment involving eight progressive steps. Note on the right how the stone carvers sculpted the painted turtles representing sense withdrawal.

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Yama: "Restraint." Virtuous and moral living, which brings purity of mind, freedom from anger, jealousy and subconscious confusion which would inhibit the process of meditation.


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Niyama: "Observance." Religious practices that cultivate the qualities of the higher nature, giving the refinement of character and mind needed to follow spiritual disciplines and ultimately plunge into samadhi.... [More]




New Info-Tech Fund to Help Monks with IT Financing

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It began in 1985 when one late afternoon Satguru Sivaya Subramuniyaswami, founder of Kauai's Hindu Monastery, entered a little computer store in the historic town of Kapaa. The event is described in The Guru Chronicles: "After playing with a state-of-the-art Macintosh for a while, he bought one for himself. Computers had never much interested him, but this one seemed different, friendly, approachable. For a week he experimented with it, calling the monks into his office every time he discovered a new feature. The guru and his shishyas learned the computer together, side by side."

The story continues. "Seeing its potential, he ordered one for each of his monks, instructing them to adapt their various services to this new tool. And did they. From that day forward, the monks saw that their satguru always had the newest, fastest, sleekest Macintosh on his desk; and from the release of Apple's first PowerBook, fellow airline passengers would gaze covetously at the holy man's cool laptop. Going headlong into the world of computers to do the work of dharma proved a strategic move of prodigious proportions." ....[click here to read more]

For additional information contact Shanmuganathaswami at 808-822-3012, ext. 244 or e-mail hhe@hindu.org. To learn more about planned giving options to provide immediate tax and income benefits to you and your family, while also providing a future gift to the Temple, please visit hheonline.org.



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You Can Help Sponsor Iraivan Temple's Perimeter Wall

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Sponsor the Perimeter Wall

The second prakaram wall is 3.5 feet tall, two feet thick and 475 feet long. It comprises 45 short pillars (the section with the pot on top) and 44 panels (the long section between the pillars). Each pillar and panel pair require 544 man-days to carve, even with the massive granite slabs being sawn to size by machine. Each panel will be inscribed (inside the ornate border shown in the photo at right) with verses from scripture and the philosophy and history of the temple.

Sponsorship

❏ One pillar section: $15,000

❏ One panel section: $30,000

Donate here!

Building Fund Donations


Thanks to Our June Temple Builders in 17 Countries

SUMMARY: For the ten months of September to June 2015, our minimum monthly goal was $650,000. Excluding contributions directed toward special projects, we received actual contributions of $721,548.70

Your support is deeply appreciated!



Donate To Iraivan, Become a Temple Builder Today!


Click Here to Donate Now!
Personal checks in certain currencies can be accepted by our bank (Euros, Pounds, Australian, Canadian and New Zealand dollars.)

Pilgrimage to Iraivan

Iraivan Temple is a punya tirtha, a sacred destination for devout pilgrims. The vision of Lord Siva on San Marga that Gurudeva was blessed with in 1975 is sustained and made manifest by the daily sadhanas of 21 resident monastics from five nations. Kadavul Hindu Temple and the many sacred areas of San Marga are available to Hindus for worship, meditation, japa and quiet reflection. It is best, if you are planning to come to visit us, to email us in advance to make sure the days of your visit coincide with our open times. And, if you want to have darshan with Satguru Bodhinatha Veylanswami, to check if he is in residence and to make the necessary appointment. Please see our visitor information pages for more details.

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